Cloud and Datacenter Management Blog

Microsoft Hybrid Cloud blogsite about Management


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#Microsoft Build 2020 Virtual Event May 19-20-21 Build your Schedule Now! #MSBuild #MVPBuzz

Microsoft Build 2020

Choose from 48 hours of continuous content to create your own digital event experience. Registration is free and is required to get full, interactive access to the digital event. Here you can register for Microsoft Build 2020 Virtual Event

The Session Catalog is Live ! Build your own Schedule hereĀ 

With 30+ Community talks, learning sessions, and skill-building activities exploring Minecraft, MakeCode, Visual Studio, AI, Azure, and more, there is something here for every student and every level of experience!

Check out the full list here or search by keyword to add lessons to your schedule.

Don’t miss this Awesome Event šŸ‘šŸ˜ŽšŸš€


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Deploy a 10 – Node Azure Service Fabric Standalone Cluster #microservices #Containers

Azure Service Fabric Standalone Cluster

Earlier I wrote a blogpost about Microsoft Azure Service Fabric Standalone Cluster for Dev testing.
This was 5 – Node Azure Service Fabric Cluster locally installed, but now I like to have a bigger ASF Cluster on my
Windows Server 2019 for testing with Visual Studio.

When you have downloaded the Microsoft Azure Service Fabric SDK into a directory

Here you see the JSON Cluster config files

I used the same JSON template for deploying a Azure Service Fabric Standalone Cluster :

Creating Cluster but with a Changed JSON Template.

Here you find the 10 – Node Azure Service Fabric Cluster Config file on Github

10 – Node Microsoft Azure Service Fabric Standalone Cluster for Dev Testing

Important : Use this Azure Service Fabric Standalone Cluster only for Learning and testing and not for production!

Here you find more information and documentation about Azure Service Fabric for Production.


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Microsoft Azure Service Fabric Standalone Cluster for Testing #microservices #Containers #Apps

Microsoft Azure Service Fabric standalone

Azure Service Fabric is a distributed systems platform that makes it easy to package, deploy, and manage scalable and reliable microservices and containers.

To build and runĀ Azure Service Fabric applicationsĀ on your Windows development machine, install the Service Fabric runtime, SDK, and tools. You also need toĀ enable execution of the Windows PowerShell scriptsĀ included in the SDK.

I have installed the latest version :

  • Service Fabric SDK and Tools 4.1.409
  • Service Fabric runtime 7.1.409

here you find more information about installing Azure Service Fabric Standalone version for testing
I have installed the Azure Service Fabric Cluster on my Windows10 Machine for testing only.

When you want to great your own Azure Service Fabric Cluster for Production, you have to prepare your self and making a plan before you build.

When you have your Azure Service Fabric Standalone Cluster running, you want to deploy your microservices, apps or containers on it and test your solution. In the following steps I deploy with Visual Studio a Web App to Azure Service Fabric Cluster Standalone version 7.1.409

Here is a Github Sample for Azure Service Fabric.

git clone https://github.com/Azure-Samples/service-fabric-dotnet-quickstart

Here you have your Clone from Github.

To deploy this App to the Azure Service Fabric Cluster we use Microsoft Visual Studio

Once the application is downloaded, you can deploy it to a cluster directly from Visual Studio.

  1. Open Visual Studio
  2. SelectĀ FileĀ >Ā Open
  3. Navigate to the folder you cloned the git repository to, and select Voting.sln
  4. Right-click on theĀ VotingĀ application project in the Solution Explorer and chooseĀ Publish

Click on Publish.

Select connection Endpoint Local Cluster and click on Publish.

The Web App is Published to the Azure Service Fabric Standalone Cluster.

When you open the Azure Service Fabric Explorer you will see your App Running

This sample is for testing only and is not secure for production, just to learn how it works šŸ˜‰

Of course you can also deploy Containers with Visual Studio to your Azure Service Fabric Standalone Cluster.

Deploying Service Fabric Container via Visual Studio.

More Azure Service Fabric information

Here you find the Azure Service Fabric documentation

Here you find the Microsoft Azure Service Fabric website

Here you find the Azure Service Fabric Tech Community Blog

Happy Testing your Apps, microservices, and Containers.

Join the Containers in the Cloud LinkedIn Community Group

 


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Microsoft Azure Monitor Overview #Cloud #Analytics #Hybrid #AzOps #Azure

Microsoft Azure Monitor

Monitor, diagnose, and gain insight into the performance and availability of your applications and services with Azure Monitor. In this video, you’ll learn how to use Azure Monitor to collect, analyze and act on telemetry from your cloud and on-premises environments.

Learn how to create time series charts of platform and resource metrics for visualization and analysis with Azure Monitor. Start in Azure Monitor to view metrics across multiple resources or start directly from individual resource blades. You will also learn how to add metrics charts to dashboards in the Azure portal for real-time monitoring and shared access across teams.

In this video, learn about action rules and how you can use them to configure actions and notifications for multiple alerts at scale across a subscription, resource group, and target resource.

In this video, learn how alerts enable you to proactively identify and address issues before it impacts the users of your system. Alerts are created on performance and availability data and can be associated with user-defined actions and notification mechanisms.

In this video, learn how to use source map support in Azure Monitor Application Insights to improve the diagnosis of client-side JavaScript errors. Source maps can be used to unminify call stacks found on the Application Insights end to end transaction details page.

Here you find more information about Microsoft Azure Monitor:


Microsoft Azure Monitor DocumentationĀ 

 

Get Started with Microsoft Azure Monitor

Follow Azure Monitor on TwitterĀ 

Microsoft Azure Monitor & Security for Hybrid IT Community Group on LinkedIn

Keep in control of IT with Microsoft Azure Monitor


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Docker Linux Container running on Windows Server 2019 #Winserv #Docker #Containers

In the following steps we install Docker for Windows enterprise on a Windows Server 2019 which is running on a hypervisor platform in this case VMware to run a Linux container in the Datacenter.

When you are on a virtualization platform like Hyper-V or VMware and you have installed de Virtual machine with Microsoft Windows Server 2019 Standard edition, you must make the virtual processors ready for virtualization.
(Nested Virtualization) otherwise you can’t install Hyper-V on VMware.

This is the error you get.

Enable this feature for virtualization to the guest OS for VMware.

When you run Microsoft Hyper-V you have to activate nested virtualization

It’s like this in PowerShell : Set-VMProcessor -VMName <VMName> -ExposeVirtualizationExtensions $true

Before you install Docker enterprise for Windows Server you have to install the Hyper-V Role and the Container Feature:

Hyper-V Role Installed

Containers Feature installed.

via Powershell is like this :

Install-WindowsFeature -Name Hyper-V,Containers -IncludeAllSubFeature -IncludeManagementTools

Now we have all the prerequisites installed on Microsoft Windows Server 2019, we can begin with Docker for Windows Enterprise via Powershell in Administrators modus :

Command: Install-Module DockerMSFTProvider

Then you type the following commands:

Import-Module -Name DockerMSFTProvider -Force

Import-Packageprovider -Name DockerMSFTProvider -Force

Command:Ā Install-Package -Name Docker -Source DockerDefault

Now we have Docker EE version 19.03.5 installed for Windows Server 2019.

It’s ready for Windows Containers.

But we want to run linux containers,

Now that we have Docker installed, we need to make some changes to the default configuration to enable support for Linux Containers.Ā This involves setting an Environment variable and creating a docker daemon configuration file.

—————————————————-

# Set LCOW_SUPPORTED Variable to 1 for enabled

[Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable(“LCOW_SUPPORTED”, “1”, “Machine”)

Ā # Enable Experimental Features in Docker daemon.conf

$configfile = @”

{

Ā Ā Ā  “experimental”: true

}

“@

$configfile|Out-File -FilePath C:\ProgramData\docker\config\daemon.json -Encoding ascii -Force

——————————————————

Because Linux Containers still need a Linux kernel, we need to deploy LCOW for it to run :

Invoke-WebRequest -Uri “https://github.com/linuxkit/lcow/releases/download/v4.14.35-v0.3.9/release.zip&#8221; -UseBasicParsing -OutFile release.zip

Expand-Archive release.zip -DestinationPath “$Env:ProgramFiles\Linux Containers\.”

Now you have to reboot the Server.

Ready for running Linux Containers.

To make Linux containers the Default you can set this environment setting :

[Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable(“LCOW_API_PLATFORM_IF_OMITTED”, “linux”, “Machine”)

Here you can read how to Pull docker Linux images to your Docker Host on Windows Server 2019

What is handy to use is Microsoft Visual Studio Code with the Docker Extension.

Wish you all the Best with Deploying Containers.


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Microsoft #Azure Private Link to your #Cloud Services

Azure Private Link provides the following benefits:

  • Privately access services on the Azure platform: Connect your virtual network to services in Azure without a public IP address at the source or destination. Service providers can render their services in their own virtual network and consumers can access those services in their local virtual network. The Private Link platform will handle the connectivity between the consumer and services over the Azure backbone network.
  • On-premises and peered networks: Access services running in Azure from on-premises over ExpressRoute private peering, VPN tunnels, and peered virtual networks using private endpoints. There’s no need to set up public peering or traverse the internet to reach the service. Private Link provides a secure way to migrate workloads to Azure.
  • Protection against data leakage: A private endpoint is mapped to an instance of a PaaS resource instead of the entire service. Consumers can only connect to the specific resource. Access to any other resource in the service is blocked. This mechanism provides protection against data leakage risks.
  • Global reach: Connect privately to services running in other regions. The consumer’s virtual network could be in region A and it can connect to services behind Private Link in region B.
  • Extend to your own services: Enable the same experience and functionality to render your service privately to consumers in Azure. By placing your service behind a standard Azure Load Balancer, you can enable it for Private Link. The consumer can then connect directly to your service using a private endpoint in their own virtual network. You can manage the connection requests using an approval call flow. Azure Private Link works for consumers and services belonging to different Azure Active Directory tenants.

Learn how to secure your Azure PaaS resources with Azure Private Link today at The Azure Academy :

Here you find more Information about Azure Private Link


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Upgrading and Monitoring Azure AKS Kubernetes Cluster #Azure #AKS #ContainerInsights

Microsoft Azure AKS Kubernetes Cluster

Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) makes it simple to deploy a managed Kubernetes cluster in Azure. AKS reduces the complexity and operational overhead of managing Kubernetes by offloading much of that responsibility to Azure. As a hosted Kubernetes service, Azure handles critical tasks like health monitoring and maintenance for you. The Kubernetes masters are managed by Azure. You only manage and maintain the agent nodes.

Azure AKS Kubernetes Services in Resource Group.

When you go to settings of your Azure AKS Kubernetes Cluster and then to Upgrade, there you can see your version of Kubernetes and the New versions of Azure AKS Services. Before you upgrade :

  • Important : Never skip an Upgrade version of Azure AKS Kubernetes.

Here you find all the information about Azure AKS Kubernetes Change Log on GitHubĀ 

You can Upgrade from here by clicking on version 1.15.5 and click on Save at the top.

Azure Activity log.

When the first upgrade is succeeded you can do the next version upgrade.

With Azure Monitoring Insights you can view the live data and see what’s going on.

Azure Monitoring Container Insights.

When the upgrade is completed, you want to see if your new Azure AKS Cluster Services is Healthy.
This Health (Preview) feature is handy to see if all Services are running good.


Azure Monitoring Insights Health of the AKS Kubernetes Services.

The Upgrades are of course also possible via Microsoft Azure Cloud Shell with Azure CLI

Azure CloudShell

To Upgrade your AKS Services via Microsoft Azure CLI

As a DevOps person you like to work with Microsoft Visual Studio Code
Deploying and managing your Azure AKS Kubernetes Cluster services from there with the right extensions.

Here you see also that the KubeProxyVersion is v1.15.7

The extension for developers building applications to run in Kubernetes clusters and for DevOps staff troubleshooting Kubernetes applications.

Features include:

  • View your clusters in an explorer tree view, and drill into workloads, services, pods and nodes.
  • Browse Helm repos and install charts into your Kubernetes cluster.
  • Intellisense for Kubernetes resources and Helm charts and templates.
  • Edit Kubernetes resource manifests and apply them to your cluster.
  • Build and run containers in your cluster from Dockerfiles in your project.
  • View diffs of a resource’s current state against the resource manifest in your Git repo
  • Easily check out the Git commit corresponding to a deployed application.
  • Run commands or start a shell within your application’s pods.
  • Get or follow logs and events from your clusters.
  • Forward local ports to your application’s pods.
  • Create Helm charts using scaffolding and snippets.
  • Bootstrap applications using Draft, and rapidly deploy and debug them to speed up the development loop.

Upgrade Azure AKS Kubernetes Services is Done šŸ˜‰

When you manage and monitor your Azure AKS Kubernetes Cluster Services, have also a look at Microsoft Azure Advisor for new features and security issues :

Azure Advisor recommendations for Kubernetes services.

The cool thing is that Microsoft also give you the solution to solve a high risk :


Remediation steps.

Conclusion :

Microsoft Azure AKS Kubernetes is a managed services and made upgrading for customers really easy to do. You can monitor the upgrades and see the Health status of the Azure AKS Kubernetes services. You get free advise to improve the Services and this all keeps you in control and your business running.


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Getting Started with Azure Stack HCI and Windows Admin Center #AzureStack #HCI #WAC

Microsoft Azure Stack HCI

Microsoft Azure Stack is a family of products and solutions that extend Azure to your datacenter or the edge. Includes Azure Stack Hub, Azure Stack HCI, and Azure Stack Edge.

Here you find all the information you need about the Microsoft Azure Stack Family

Here you find the Azure Stack HCI Overview

The Power of Hybrid IT Management is awesome with Azure Hybrid Services for your Servers with Microsoft Windows Admin Center. While you can set up most Azure hybrid services by downloading an app and doing some manual configuration, many are integrated directly into Windows Admin Center to provide a simplified setup experience and a server-centric view of the services. Windows Admin Center also provides convenient intelligent hyperlinks to the Azure portal to see connected Azure resources as well as a centralized view of your hybrid environment.

Hybrid IT Management with Azure Family and Windows Admin Center.

See here the Differences between global Azure, Azure Stack, and Azure Stack HCI

 


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Kubernetes Up and Running Second Edition Ebook

 

Kubernetes Up & Running Second Edition Ebook

Whether you are new to distributed systems or have been deploying cloud-native systems for years, containers and Kubernetes can help you achieve new levels of velocity, agility, reliability, and efficiency. This book describes the Kubernetes cluster orchestrator and how its tools and APIs can be used to improve the development, delivery, and maintenance of distributed applications. Though no previous experience with Kubernetes is assumed, to make maximal use of the book you should be comfortable building and deploying server-based applications. Familiarity with concepts like load balancers and network storage will be useful, though not required. Likewise, experience with Linux, Linux containers, and Docker, though not essential, will help you make the most of this book.


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Creating Azure Virtual Machine via the Portal #Winserv #Linux #Azure

Microsoft Azure Cloud Services is evolving really fast with New solutions and features every day for your business. In the following step-by-step guide we will see all the options and features when you create a virtual machine in the Azure Cloud. For this you need a Microsoft Azure subscription to start. When you are in the Azure Portal you begin with + Create a Resource and from there you see all the create items. Click on Compute and you will see the picture above what you can create. I’m going to create a Windows Server 2019 datacenter edition Virtual Machine in the Microsoft Azure Cloud. In the Azure Portal is a step by step wizard to help you with your choices.

Basic tab

We start by selecting the right Azure subscription ( if you have Multiple) like a Hub-Spoke model design
you can choose for your deployment. Then select a Resource Group or Create New. I made a new Resource Group called RSG-Winserv.

 

When you go further down, you must give your Virtual Machine a name and select the Microsoft Azure region where your VM will run. I Choose West Europe because I life in the Netherlands. For availability options of the Virtual Machine you can choose out of three options :

  1. No infrastructure redundancy required
  2. Availability zone
  3. Availability set

Availability Zones is a high-availability offering that protects your applications and data from datacenter failures. Availability Zones are unique physical locations within an Azure region. Each zone is made up of one or more datacenters equipped with independent power, cooling, and networking

An Availability Set is a logical grouping capability that you can use in Azure to ensure that the VM resources you place within it are isolated from each other when they are deployed within an Azure datacenter. Azure ensures that the VMs you place within an Availability Set run across multiple physical servers, compute racks, storage units, and network switches

Microsoft Azure got a lot of software operating images, I installed Windows Server 2019 Datacenter but have a look at Browse all Public and Private images :

Small Disk Images

More images like Kali and Red Hat

The next step is the VM Size, the “hardware” requirements of the Virtual Machine. When you choose your VM size you have to know the possibilities and feature set of the Virtual Machine. This article describes the available sizes and options for the Azure virtual machines you can use to run your Windows apps and workloads. It also provides deployment considerations to be aware of when you’re planning to use these resources.

Here is Microsoft Azure showing 250 different VM sizes

In this window you see the following items of the Virtual Machine specs :

  • VM Size
  • Offering
  • Family
  • vCPUs
  • Memory RAM
  • Data Disks
  • Max IOPS
  • Temporary Storage
  • Ā Premium Disks (Yes or No)
  • Cost / Month Estimated

So pick the right VM Size for your solution to do the job.

Allow Public Internet Inbound Port Rules

If you need this for example a website, then you can set it right away, but you can set it on None and change the Network Security Group (NSG) or Azure App Gateway or Azure Firewall later and keep it Closed for now. I will show this in the NSG later to get RDP access.

Hybrid Benefit

You can enable great savings in Azure with Windows Server Software Assurance by using Azure Hybrid Benefit for Windows Server. Azure Hybrid Benefit for Windows Server allows you to use your on-premises Windows Server licenses and run Windows virtual machines in Microsoft Azure at a reduced cost (i.e. at Linux rates). You can use your licenses for Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012 R2, and Windows Server 2016. The Azure Hybrid Benefit for Windows Server is applicable to Windows Server Standard and Datacenter editions as well as other versions obtained via custom images. With Azure Hybrid Benefit for Windows Server, you can save 40 percent or more1 on Windows Server virtual machines by paying only the base compute2 ratesā€”adding value to your Software Assurance investments. The benefit is available across all Azure regions. Read more here

Disks tab

Disk storage is important for performance, that’s why you can choose for Standard HDD,Ā  Standard SSD or
Premium SSD for your OS Disk. When your server need a Data disk, you can add it here or later on.
Here you can read more on Managed disks
What disk types are available in Azure?

Networking tab

Here you create your Virtual Network / subnet with a public IP. You can see here when you choose for a specific Virtual machine, you can not use accelerated networking because It’s not supported by the VM size selection.

Here you can choose for a Load Balancer or a Application Gateway

Azure Application Gateway is a web traffic load balancer that enables you to manage traffic to your web applications. Traditional load balancers operate at the transport layer (OSI layer 4 – TCP and UDP) and route traffic based on source IP address and port, to a destination IP address and port.

Azure Application Gateway

With Azure Load Balancer, you can scale your applications and create high availability for your services. Load Balancer supports inbound and outbound scenarios, provides low latency and high throughput, and scales up to millions of flows for all TCP and UDP applications.
Load Balancer distributes new inbound flows that arrive on the Load Balancer’s frontend to backend pool instances, according to rules and health probes.
Additionally, a public Load Balancer can provide outbound connections for virtual machines (VMs) inside your virtual network by translating their private IP addresses to public IP addresses.
Azure Load Balancer is available in two SKUs: Basic and Standard. There are differences in scale, features, and pricing. Any scenario that’s possible with Basic Load Balancer can also be created with Standard Load Balancer, although the approaches might differ slightly. As you learn about Load Balancer, it is important to familiarize yourself with the fundamentals and SKU-specific differences.

Management tab

When you have deployed your virtual machine, you want to manage it like monitoring and backup for example.
You can do these options also after the Virtual Machine deployment.
Backup of the Virtual Machine can be added when you deploy the VM.

I have a existing Backup Vault called WACvault1

From here you can create your own backup recovery Vault with your Own backup policy and retention times.

The feature provides Azure services with an automatically managed identity in Azure AD. You can use the identity to authenticate to any service that supports Azure AD authentication, including Key Vault, without any credentials in your code. What is managed identities for Azure resources?

Advanced tab

In the advanced tab you can select extensions for your Virtual Machine. These are add-ons and will installed during the deployment. You can now also select Gen 2 VM in Preview. Microsoft Azure has a lot of extensions for your Virtual machine :

List of extensions for your VM

Click on Create for adding Microsoft Antimalware on your VM

Select the options and exclusions

Tags tab

Here you can Tag your deployment

After you apply tags, you can retrieve all the resources in your subscription with that tag name and value. Tags enable you to retrieve related resources from different resource groups. This approach is helpful when you need to organize resources for billing or management. Read more on Tags here

At this moment the validation has passed for deployment with all your settings, but don’t forget to have a look at “Download a template for Automation”Ā  before you hit Create.

Here you can download or save the JSON ARM Template

When you you go Back and click on Create the Virtual Machine, this will deploy the VM in Minutes.

The following Azure items are deployed in RSG-Winserv

Now your Virtual Machine is deployed in Microsoft Azure Cloud and is running, you can have a look at all the features of the Virtual Machine in the Portal.
To connect to the Virtual Machine you have to Manage access for your RDP session via the NSG in my case:

Double click on the NSG

I added a new rule to give my IP-address access to the VM

From here you can access the Windows Server 2019 Datacenter Virtual Machine in Microsoft Azure Cloud.

Management of your Virtual Machine

When your Azure Virtual Machine with Windows Server 2019 is running, you want to monitor the VM and see what is happening inside the Virtual Machine. Azure Monitor Insights can help you with this.

Health State of the VM

Connections

When Microsoft Azure Monitoring is on and running you want have important alerts on your Mobile by sms or
via E-mail notification to take action.

Alerts on Winserv2019 VM

High CPU Alert

Here we make an Alert about the CPU which is going higher then 80% average.

Making an Action group for email notification of the Alert

Action Group made

Alert made for the VM

Alert details

Alert rule is set and running for this Virtual Machine.

Conclusion

  1. You can create every virtual machine you want for your business, Windows Server or Linux..
  2. You can mange your own performance for the VM on demand by selecting the right VM Size.
  3. You can set Networking and High Availability
  4. You can set Disk Performance for your IOPS
  5. You can configure your management settings and dashboard for Monitoring.
  6. Security can be set on different levels.
  7. Backup of the Virtual Machine can be set with the right policy before deployment.
  8. and more…….

And keep watching your Azure Advisor for better changes :

New Advise will come !

and of course there are more features and options on this Virtual Machine, Have a look :

Settings of the VM

Operations and Management of the VM

Support and Troubleshooting of the VM