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Microsoft SystemCenter blogsite about virtualization on-premises and Cloud


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NEW #Docker version 1.13.0 available for Download #Containers #ACS #DevOps

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  • Upgrades
  • New
    • Windows containers
    • Improved UI for Daemon.json editing
    • VHDX file containing images and non-host mounted volumes can be moved (using “advanced” tab in the UI)
    • Support for arm, aarch64, ppc64le architectures using qemu
    • TRIM support for disk (shrinks virtual disk)
    • VM’s time synchronization is forced after the host wakes from sleep mode
    • Docker Experimental mode can be toggled
  • Bug fixes and minor changes
    • Improved Proxy UI
    • Improvements to Logging and Diagnostics
    • About Box is now Copy/Paste enabled
    • Improvements in drive sharing code
    • Optimized boot process
    • Trend Micro Office Scan made the Api proxy think no drive was shared
    • Show a link to the virtualization documentation
    • Always remove the disk on factory reset (#5719)
    • VPNKit: Improved diagnostics (#6080, #6104)
    • VPNKit: Forwarded UDP datagrams should have correct source port numbers (#5926)
    • VPNKit: If one request fails, allow other concurrent requests to succeed. For example this allows IPv4 servers to work even if IPv6 is broken. (#5926)
    • VPNKit: Fix bug which could cause the connection tracking to underestimate the number of active connections (#5926)
    • VPNKit: add a local cache of DNS responses

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Running #NanoServer in a #Container on Windows Server 2016 with #Docker in Powershell #DevOps

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What are Containers

They are an isolated, resource controlled, and portable operating environment. 

Basically, a container is an isolated place where an application can run without affecting the rest of the system and without the system affecting the application. Containers are the next evolution in virtualization. 

If you were inside a container, it would look very much like you were inside a freshly installed physical computer or a virtual machine. And, to Docker, a Windows Server Container can be managed in the same way as any other container.

Windows Container Types

Windows Containers include two different container types, or runtimes. 

Windows Server Containers – provide application isolation through process and namespace isolation technology. A Windows Server container shares a kernel with the container host and all containers running on the host.

Hyper-V Containers – expand on the isolation provided by Windows Server Containers by running each container in a highly optimized virtual machine. In this configuration the kernel of the container host is not shared with the Hyper-V Containers. 

hyper-v-containers

Container Fundamentals

When you begin working with containers you will notice many similarities between a container and a virtual machine. A container runs an operating system, has a file system and can be accessed over a network just as if it was a physical or virtual computer system. That said, the technology and concepts behind containers are very different from that of virtual machines.

The following key concepts will be helpful as you begin creating and working with Windows Containers.  

Container Host: Physical or Virtual computer system configured with the Windows Container feature. The container host will run one or more Windows Containers.

Container Image: As modifications are made to a containers file system or registry, such as with software installation they are captured in a sandbox. In many cases you may want to capture this state such that new containers can be created that inherit these changes. That’s what an image is – once the container has stopped you can either discard that sandbox or you can convert it into a new container image. For example, let’s imagine that you have deployed a container from the Windows Server Core OS image. You then install MySQL into this container. Creating a new image from this container would act as a deployable version of the container. This image would only contain the changes made (MySQL), however would work as a layer on top of the Container OS Image.

Sandbox: Once a container has been started, all write actions such as file system modifications, registry modifications or software installations are captured in this ‘sandbox’ layer.

Container OS Image: Containers are deployed from images. The container OS image is the first layer in potentially many image layers that make up a container. This image provides the operating system environment. A Container OS Image is Immutable, it cannot be modified.

Container Repository: Each time a container image is created the container image and its dependencies are stored in a local repository. These images can be reused many times on the container host. The container images can also be stored in a public or private registry such as DockerHub so that they can be used across many different container host.

You have to install these Windows Server 2016 Rolls and Feature first before you start with Containers :

  • Hyper-V
  • Containers

system

My Windows 2016 Server Build version.

hyperv-install

Install Hyper-V

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Install Containers

Here is an example on my Windows 2016 Server to get started with Windows Containers :

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Install-Module -Name DockerMsftProvider -Repository PSGallery -Force

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Install-Package -Name docker -ProviderName DockerMsftProvider

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Restart-Computer -Force

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Here we pull out of the Docker Hub the Microsoft Nanoserver Container.

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Downloading the Image.

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Automatically extract the image.

containers8 Docker Container Image Microsoft/nanoserver is downloaded.

run-container

Docker run -i -t microsoft/nanoserver

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docker ps
( you will see the container with Nanoserver is running)

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Inside the container.

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Running Powershell inside the container.

Containers for Developers

From a developer’s desktop to a testing machine to a set of production machines, a Docker image can be created that will deploy identically across any environment in seconds. This story has created a massive and growing ecosystem of applications packaged in Docker containers, with DockerHub, the public containerized-application registry that Docker maintains, currently publishing more than 180,000 applications in the public community repository.  

When you containerize an app, only the app and the components needed to run the app are combined into an “image”. Containers are then created from this image as you need them. You can also use an image as a baseline to create another image, making image creation even faster. Multiple containers can share the same image, which means containers start very quickly and use fewer resources. For example, you can use containers to spin up light-weight and portable app components – or ‘micro-services’ – for distributed apps and quickly scale each service separately. 

Because the container has everything it needs to run your application, they are very portable and can run on any machine that is running Windows Server 2016. You can create and test containers locally, then deploy that same container image to your company’s private cloud, public cloud or service provider. The natural agility of Containers supports modern app development patterns in large scale, virtualized and cloud environments.

With containers, developers can build an app in any language. These apps are completely portable and can run anywhere – laptop, desktop, server, private cloud, public cloud or service provider – without any code changes.

Containers helps developers build and ship higher-quality applications, faster.

Containers for IT Pro’s

IT Professionals can use containers to provide standardized environments for their development, QA, and production teams. They no longer have to worry about complex installation and configuration steps. By using containers, systems administrators abstract away differences in OS installations and underlying infrastructure. Containers help admins create an infrastructure that is simpler to update and maintain

microsoft-containers

Lot of Success with Containers and Nanoserver
#MVPbuzz


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#Docker containers running on #Windows10 for #DevOps #Azure

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Docker for Windows

An integrated, easy-to-deploy environment for building, assembling, and shipping applications from a Windows PC, Docker for Windows is a native Windows application with a native user interface and auto-update capability, deeply integrated with Windows native virtualization, Hyper-V, networking and file system, making it faster and more reliable than previous ways of getting Docker on a Windows PC

Before you install Docker for Windows 10 make sure you have the right Windows 10 version.
The current version of Docker for Windows runs on 64bit Windows 10 Pro, Enterprise and Education (1511 November update, Build 10586 or later).
And have the Hyper-V feature of Windows 10 installed. Here you can download Docker for Windows 10

docker-download

docker-setup1

Click on Install.

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Click Finish and Launch Docker

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hyper-v

The Docker VM

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Now you can work from Powershell with Docker Containers :

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There is also a graphical GUI called Kitematic with the Docker Hub connection for the Container marketplace.

open-kitematic

This will download Kitematic.

kitematicExtract the zip file and run Kitematic

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docker-kite

Kitematic with recommended Docker Containers to download 😉

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If you search for Azure you find a lot of Azure related Docker Containers.

It’s so easy to download a container from the Docker Hub and make it running on your Windows 10 Machine, here is an example of an Jenkins Container:

jenkins

Click Create.

download-images

It’s downloading the Docker Container Image.

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Jenkins is already running in the Docker Container and is
asking some questions for the setup.

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Jenkins is setting up the environment.

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And now we have Jenkins in a Container running.

Here you can find more information about Jenkins

jenkins-running

And with Kitematic you can see the log of the Jenkins Container
Here you can start, restart or stop the Docker Containers.

jenkins-inspect

Here I did a Docker Inspect Jenkins to see settings of the Container.

Hope this blogpost is useful to play with Docker Containers on your Windows 10 device 😉

When you want to learn more about Microsoft Windows Containers you can start here :

Windows Containers Documentation

acs

When you want to learn more about Microsoft Azure Container Services you can start here :

Azure Container Service Documentation

docker-containers

Lot of Success with running Containers !


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#MSIgnite recorded Video Sessions #Azure #AzureStack #MSOMS #Sysctr #Winserv and More

Take your management and security strategy to the cloud with Operations Management Suite (OMS)

Review Microsoft Azure Stack with Jeffrey Snover and Mark Russinovich

Dive deep into Operations Management Suite for applications and infrastructure

Here you find all the recorded Microsoft Ignite video sessions 2016

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#Microsoft Windows Server 2016 TP4 Overview is Available #MSDN #TechNet #Hyperv #NanoServer #Winserv #AzureStack

Storage Spaces Direct Stack

Storage Spaces Direct in Windows Server 2016 Technical Preview (TP4)

Storage Spaces Direct seamlessly integrates with the features you know today that make up the Windows Server software defined storage stack, including Scale-Out File Server, Clustered Shared Volume File System (CSVFS), Storage Spaces and Failover Clustering

Storage Replica Overview

What’s New in Windows Server 2016 Technical Preview 4

  • What’s New in Nano Server. Nano Server now supports the DNS Server and IIS server roles, as well as MPIO, VMM, SCOM, DSC push mode, DCB, Windows Server Installer, and the WMI provider for Windows Update. Its Recovery Console supports editing and repairing the network configuration. A Windows PowerShell module is now available to simplify building Nano Server images.

nanoserver

  • Windows Containers: Windows Server 2016 Technical Preview now includes containers, which allow many isolated applications to run on one computer system. They build fast and are highly scalable and portable. Two different types of container runtime are included with the feature, each with a different degree of application isolation. Windows Server Containers achieve isolation through namespace and process isolation. Hyper-V Containers encapsulates each container in a light weight virtual machine. For some additional information on containers, see Containers: Docker, Windows and Trends.

Containers

MVP Cloud Cluster

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  • Windows Defender Overview for Windows Server Technical Preview. Windows Server Antimalware is installed and enabled by default in Windows Server 2016 Technical Preview, but the user interface for Windows Server Antimalware is not installed. However, Windows Server Antimalware will update antimalware definitions and protect the computer without the user interface. If you need the user interface for Windows Server Antimalware, you can install it after the operating system installation by using the Add Roles and Features Wizard.
  • What’s New in Remote Desktop Services in Windows Server 2016. For the Windows Server 2016 Technical Preview, the Remote Desktop Services team focused on improvements based on customer requests. We added support for OpenGL and OpenCL applications, and added MultiPoint Services as a new role in Windows Server.
  • What’s New in File and Storage Services in Windows Server 2016 Technical Preview. This topic explains the new and changed functionality of Storage Services. An update in storage quality of service now enables you to create storage QoS policies on a Scale-Out File Server and assign them to one or more virtual disks on Hyper-V virtual machines. Storage Replica is a new feature that enables synchronous replication between servers for disaster recovery, as well as stretching of a failover cluster for high availability..
  • What’s New in Web Application Proxy in Windows Server Technical Preview. The latest version of Web Application Proxy focuses on new features that enable publishing and preauthentication for more applications and improved user experience. Check out the full list of new features that includes preauthentication for rich client apps such as Exchange ActiveSync and wildcard domains for easier publishing of SharePoint apps.
  • What’s new in the Windows console. The underlying console host (Conhost.exe) has been updated in several ways, adding new and different functionality to the Windows command prompt, the Windows PowerShell prompt, and any other character-mode applications. For details, see What’s New in the Windows Console in Windows Server 2016 Technical Preview and Console Improvements in the Windows 10 Technical Preview , but you should take note of these important changes:
    • The new console functionality is enabled by default. If an existing application doesn’t work properly with the new console, you can select Use legacy console on the Options tab and then restart your application. You can also control individual aspects of the new functionality with registry keys; see details at the linked topics.
    • Console windows can be resized dynamically with the mouse. This could cause issues with some console applications.
    • Quick Edit mode is enabled by default. If this conflicts with your application, you can disable it on the Options tab.
    • There are new keyboard shortcuts for copy, paste, and history navigation. If these conflict with your application, you can disable them on the Options tab (look for Enable CTRL key shortcuts and Extended test selection keys).
    • The default font type for new console windows is TrueType. You can still use raster fonts, but they won’t scale properly on some displays.
    • Text wraps and reflows by default when you resize a window. If necessary, you can disable this on the Layouts tab.
    • In some cases, after upgrade installation, fonts in the console window might be very small. To adjust this, use the Fonts tab.
  • What’s New in Windows PowerShell 5.0. Windows PowerShell 5.0 includes significant new features—including support for developing with classes, and new security features—that extend its use, improve its usability, and allow you to control and manage Windows-based environments more easily and comprehensively. Multiple new features in Windows PowerShell Desired State Configuration (DSC) are also described in this topic.
  • What’s New in Networking in Windows Server Technical Preview. The majority of what you’ll find for networking is new in TP3. We bring a scalable network controller for programming policies, an L4 load balancer for high availability and performance, enhanced gateways for hybrid connectivity, and an underlying network fabric that converges RDMA traffic together with tenant traffic, DNS policies that control how your DNS servers respond to incoming requests, and better integration of DNS and IPAM.

Windows Server 2016 TP4

 

 

Win2016TP4

You can download Microsoft Windows Server 2016 TP4 via MSDN now

Win2016TP4 via Technet

Or Download Windows Server 2016 TP4 here from Microsoft Technet

Ps. Awesome that Microsoft Windows Server 2016 TP4 was Public Available on the Dutch Community event  Experts Live 2015 🙂


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#Microsoft Windows Containers Overview #Hyperv #Azure #Winserv

Containers

Windows containers provide operating system level virtualization that allow you to run multiple isolated applications on one container host.

Here you find the Microsoft MSDN website about Windows Containers

Quick Start: Windows Server Containers and PowerShell

This article will walk through the fundamentals of managing Windows Server Containers with PowerShell. Items covered will include creating Windows Server Containers and Windows Server Container Images, removing Windows Server Containers and Container Images and finally deploying an application into a Windows Server Container. The lessons learned in this walkthrough should enable you to begin exploring deployment and management of Windows Server Containers using PowerShell.

Containers_Powershell_Video

Here you can find the complete Quick Start for Windows Server Containers and Powershell

Here you can find the Complete Quick Start for Windows Server Containers and Docker

Windows Server containers, Docker, and an introduction to Azure Container Service Video

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