Cloud and Datacenter Management Blog

Microsoft Hybrid Cloud blogsite about Management


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Windows Admin Center and The Container Extension #WAC #Containers #Winserv

Windows Admin Center

Windows Admin Center is a locally deployed, browser-based app for managing Windows servers, clusters, hyper-converged infrastructure, as well as Windows 10 PCs. It comes at no additional cost beyond Windows and is ready to use in production. If you want to work more secure with Windows Server Core images without the GUI or with Microsoft Azure Stack HCI operating system then Windows Admin Center is the tool for the Administrator to manage your workloads on-premises or in the Cloud. You have one web based interface for all your Server consoles (MMC) to manage your Hybrid Datacenter.
Here you can read more about Microsoft Windows Admin Center and download the free software.

Get the best with Windows Admin Center Extensions

Windows Admin Center and the Container Extension

When you have installed Microsoft Windows Admin Center you can configure the settings and extensions for your environment. When you want the benefits of the Microsoft azure Cloud Services you can configure your Azure subscription and add the extensions to your Windows Admin Center. There are also Third Party extensions like Dell, DataOn, Fujitsu and more.
Here you find more information about how extensions work.

Container Extension

In the following step-by-step guide we will work with the Container Extension of Windows Admin Center on a Windows Server 2019. You have already added the server in WAC and installed the Container extension. In my MVPLAB.CLOUD is that Windows Server 2019 datacenter Starship01.mvplab.cloud. When you open the server you will come in the Overview of the Windows Server:

Click on Containers.

Click on Install for the Docker installation on Starship01.mvplab.cloud.

This will install Docker on the Windows Server 2019 and reboot when it’s ready to use for Containers. From this moment you can work with Windows Containers on the host via Windows Admin Center.

Remote Desktop in Windows Admin Center, the docker host is installed with the Windows Filter by default.

When you want to use Docker Linux Containers with Windows Server 2019 host, you have to configure the Linux kit LCOW with a distro on the host. More info here

Containers on Starship01.mvplab.cloud

To start with containers you can create your own, or pull an image from Docker Hub with Windows Admin Center. In my case I pull Windows Server 2019 ltsc with IIS image.

mcr.microsoft.com/windows/servercore/iis  (Image)

windowsservercore-ltsc2019 (Tag)

Click then on Pull.

Select your image and click on Run.
Give your Container a name and set your settings.

Click on Run.

Click on Containers tab and you will see your running Container

More details you see the IP-Address of the Container.

IIS is running on Windows Server 2019 ltsc in a Docker Windows Container.
That was easy right 😉

Making your Own Docker file with Windows Admin Center Container Extension

When you have your own Github repository with your software, you can make your own docker file and make a docker image on your host for deployment. To show this I have used this sample on Microsoft docs, but you can clone also a github repository and copy the dockerfile on the host.

I copied the dockerfile on the host C:\BuildImage.

—————

# Sample Dockerfile

# Indicates that the windowsservercore image will be used as the base image.
FROM mcr.microsoft.com/windows/servercore:ltsc2019

# Metadata indicating an image maintainer.
LABEL maintainer=”jshelton@contoso.com”

# Uses dism.exe to install the IIS role.
RUN dism.exe /online /enable-feature /all /featurename:iis-webserver /NoRestart

# Creates an HTML file and adds content to this file.
RUN echo “Hello World – Dockerfile” > c:\inetpub\wwwroot\index.html

# Sets a command or process that will run each time a container is run from the new image.
CMD [ “cmd” ]


Here is the Microsoft docs website

Image Creation in progress

New Image Created with Windows Admin Center

Running your Own Container image

Container “Hello World – Dockerfile” running

Conclusion :

In Windows Admin Center comes ITpro world and DevOps world Together in One web based console like with the Container extension. Microsoft is developing really fast in Windows Admin Center to get all the right Feature for ITPro, DevOps and SecOps Administrators in one place. Awesome are the Windows Admin Center Extensions, developers makes these better and better to do the job for Administrators 🚀
Windows Server 2019 Core and Azure Stack HCI are Operating systems without a GUI, and with Windows Admin Center they are really good to manage, update and keeping in control of security.
I like Windows Admin Center a lot and it Rocks for managing your hybrid Datacenter 😉

Send your comments and feedback via Microsoft GitHub repo by opening a new issue for the Container Extension. Follow @vrapolinario on Twitter

 

You can Follow Windows Admin Center here on Twitter : @servermgmt


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Docker Linux Container running on Windows Server 2019 #Winserv #Docker #Containers

In the following steps we install Docker for Windows enterprise on a Windows Server 2019 which is running on a hypervisor platform in this case VMware to run a Linux container in the Datacenter.

When you are on a virtualization platform like Hyper-V or VMware and you have installed de Virtual machine with Microsoft Windows Server 2019 Standard edition, you must make the virtual processors ready for virtualization.
(Nested Virtualization) otherwise you can’t install Hyper-V on VMware.

This is the error you get.

Enable this feature for virtualization to the guest OS for VMware.

When you run Microsoft Hyper-V you have to activate nested virtualization

It’s like this in PowerShell : Set-VMProcessor -VMName <VMName> -ExposeVirtualizationExtensions $true

Before you install Docker enterprise for Windows Server you have to install the Hyper-V Role and the Container Feature:

Hyper-V Role Installed

Containers Feature installed.

via Powershell is like this :

Install-WindowsFeature -Name Hyper-V,Containers -IncludeAllSubFeature -IncludeManagementTools

Now we have all the prerequisites installed on Microsoft Windows Server 2019, we can begin with Docker for Windows Enterprise via Powershell in Administrators modus :

Command: Install-Module DockerMSFTProvider

Then you type the following commands:

Import-Module -Name DockerMSFTProvider -Force

Import-Packageprovider -Name DockerMSFTProvider -Force

Command: Install-Package -Name Docker -Source DockerDefault

Now we have Docker EE version 19.03.5 installed for Windows Server 2019.

It’s ready for Windows Containers.

But we want to run linux containers,

Now that we have Docker installed, we need to make some changes to the default configuration to enable support for Linux Containers. This involves setting an Environment variable and creating a docker daemon configuration file.

—————————————————-

# Set LCOW_SUPPORTED Variable to 1 for enabled

[Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable(“LCOW_SUPPORTED”, “1”, “Machine”)

 # Enable Experimental Features in Docker daemon.conf

$configfile = @”

{

    “experimental”: true

}

“@

$configfile|Out-File -FilePath C:\ProgramData\docker\config\daemon.json -Encoding ascii -Force

——————————————————

Because Linux Containers still need a Linux kernel, we need to deploy LCOW for it to run :

Invoke-WebRequest -Uri “https://github.com/linuxkit/lcow/releases/download/v4.14.35-v0.3.9/release.zip&#8221; -UseBasicParsing -OutFile release.zip

Expand-Archive release.zip -DestinationPath “$Env:ProgramFiles\Linux Containers\.”

Now you have to reboot the Server.

Ready for running Linux Containers.

To make Linux containers the Default you can set this environment setting :

[Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable(“LCOW_API_PLATFORM_IF_OMITTED”, “linux”, “Machine”)

Here you can read how to Pull docker Linux images to your Docker Host on Windows Server 2019

What is handy to use is Microsoft Visual Studio Code with the Docker Extension.

Wish you all the Best with Deploying Containers.


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Getting started with #Microsoft Azure Cognitive Services in #Containers #Azure #AI #AKS #Docker

Microsoft Visual Studio Code Tools for AI

With container support, customers can use Azure’s intelligent Cognitive Services capabilities, wherever the data resides. This means customers can perform facial recognition, OCR, or text analytics operations without sending their content to the cloud. Their intelligent apps are portable and scale with greater consistency whether they run on the edge or in Azure.

Bringing AI to the Edge via  Corporate Vice President, Azure AI Eric Boyd

Get started with these Azure Cognitive Services Containers

Building solutions with machine learning often requires a data scientist. Azure Cognitive Services enable organizations to take advantage of AI with developers, without requiring a data scientist. We do this by taking the machine learning models and the pipelines and the infrastructure needed to build a model and packaging it up into a Cognitive Service for vision, speech, search, text processing, language understanding, and more. This makes it possible for anyone who can write a program, to now use machine learning to improve an application. However, many enterprises still face challenges building large-scale AI systems. Today Microsoft announced container support for Cognitive Services, making it significantly easier for developers to build ML-driven solutions.

Microsoft got the following Containers :

  • Text Analytics Containers
  • Face Container
  • Recognize Text Container

More information from Director of Program Management Applied AI Lance Olson here

Start with Installing and running Containers

Request access to the private container registry

You must first complete and submit the Cognitive Services Vision Containers Request form to request access to the Face container. The form requests information about you, your company, and the user scenario for which you’ll use the container. Once submitted, the Azure Cognitive Services team reviews the form to ensure that you meet the criteria for access to the private container registry.

Important !

You must use an email address associated with either a Microsoft Account (MSA) or Azure Active Directory (Azure AD) account in the form. If your request is approved, you then receive an email with instructions describing how to obtain your credentials and access the private container registry.

Read more about installing the Containers here

The Face container uses a common configuration framework, so that you can easily configure and manage storage, logging and telemetry, and security settings for your containers.
Configuration settings
Configuration settings in the Face container are hierarchical, and all containers use a shared hierarchy, based on the following top-level structure:

  • ApiKey
  • ApplicationInsights
  • Authentication
  • Billing
  • CloudAI
  • Eula
  • Fluentd
  • Logging
  • Mounts

Read more here about Configuring the Containers

Follow Containers in the Cloud Community Group

 


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Make your first Pipeline with Azure DevOps Project in the #Cloud #Azure #AzureDevOps


Start here your Azure DevOps Project in Azure.

Microsoft Azure DevOps Services (Tools) to make your own CI/CD Pipeline in the Cloud

Azure Pipelines is a cloud service that you can use to automatically build and test your code project and make it available to other users. It works with just about any language or project type.
Pipelines combines both Continuous Integration (CI) and Continuous Deployment (CD) to constantly and consistently test and build your code and ship it to any target.

Microsoft made it really easy to make your first Azure DevOps Pipeline in the Cloud.
Here you find a step-by-step guide to make your first Azure pipeline :

When you already made your Cloud application, you can choose option Bring your Own Code 😉

But in this step-by-step guide, I choose for a HTML5 Azure Web App template which is available in Azure.

Static Azure Website => Next.

When you create your Azure DevOps project you can see the Flow steps for Creation.

For the Service of the Web App, there are two options in this deployment template :

  1. Web App for Containers
  2. Web App as a Service.

Azure Web Apps enables you to build and host web applications in the programming language of your choice without managing infrastructure. It offers auto-scaling and high availability, supports both Windows and Linux, and enables automated deployments from GitHub, Azure DevOps, or any Git repo

Web App for Containers provides built-in Docker images on Linux with support for specific versions, such as PHP 7.0 and Node.js 4.5. Web App for Containers uses the Docker container technology to host both built-in images and custom images as a platform as a service. In this tutorial, you learn how to build a custom Docker image and deploy it to Web App for Containers. This pattern is useful when the built-in images don’t include your language of choice, or when your application requires a specific configuration that isn’t provided within the built-in images.

The last step needs information about :

  • Organization: for the site name.
  • Projectname
  • Subscription ID
  • Web App Name
  • Azure Location.

And then click on Done

 

Deployment overview.

Your Azure DevOps Pipeline is Running as easy like that 🙂

But most important your Azure Web App is running.

Running in your Container in Azure Cloud Services.

Azure DevOps Container Web App Pipeline is running.

From here you can build your Project and Share it with your Developer Team.
More information you can find on Azure DevOps Docs

Here you see some snapshots on the latest Releases of Azure DevOps release features when I made this blogpost :

When you want to keep up-to-date on Microsoft Azure DevOps, here are some links :

Follow Microsoft Azure DevOps on Twitter

Start here free with Azure DevOps

Microsoft Azure DevOps Blog

JOIN the Azure DevOps Community Group on LinkedIn


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A Great #Microservices E-book about Architecture for Containerized #dotnet Apps #Docker #Kubernetes #Containers

Enterprises are increasingly realizing cost savings, solving deployment problems, and improving DevOps and production operations by using containers. Microsoft has been releasing container innovations for Windows and Linux by creating products like Azure Container Service and Azure Service Fabric, and by partnering with industry leaders like Docker, Mesosphere, and Kubernetes. These products deliver container solutions that help companies build and deploy applications at cloud speed and scale, whatever their choice of platform or tools.
Docker is becoming the de facto standard in the container industry, supported by the most significant vendors in the Windows and Linux ecosystems. (Microsoft is one of the main cloud vendors supporting Docker.) In the future, Docker will probably be ubiquitous in any datacenter in the cloud or on-premises.
In addition, the microservices architecture is emerging as an important approach for distributed mission-critical applications. In a microservice-based architecture, the application is built on a collection of services that can be developed, tested, deployed, and versioned independent

You can download .NET Microservices Architecture for Containerized .NET Application E-book here

eShoponContainers 


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Deploying Containers on #Kubernetes Cluster in #Docker for Windows CE and on #Azure AKS

Kubernetes Custer via Docker for Windows CE Edge

Docker CE for Windows is Docker designed to run on Windows 10. It is a native Windows application that provides an easy-to-use development environment for building, shipping, and running dockerized apps. Docker CE for Windows uses Windows-native Hyper-V virtualization and networking and is the fastest and most reliable way to develop Docker apps on Windows. Docker CE for Windows supports running both Linux and Windows Docker containers.
Download Docker for Windows Community Edition Edge here

From Docker for Windows version 18.02 CE Edge includes a standalone Kubernetes server and client, as well as Docker CLI integration. The Kubernetes server runs locally within your Docker instance, is not configurable, and is a single-node cluster.

I’m using Docker for Windows CE version 18.05.0

Now your Single node Kubernetes Cluster is running.

To get the Kubernetes Dashboard you have to install it with Kubectl :

kubectl create -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/kubernetes/dashboard/master/src/deploy/recommended/kubernetes-dashboard.yaml

Run kubectl proxy

Keep this running.

Go with your browser to : http://localhost:8001/api/v1/namespaces/kube-system/services/https:kubernetes-dashboard:/proxy/#!/login  and you can skip kubeconfig for now.

You are now in the Kubernetes Dashboard.

Now it’s time to make your first containers (Pods) on Kubernetes.
Click on +CREATE in the upper right corner.

For example code I used a yaml script to deploy Nginx with 3 replicas

Deploying the Nginx Containers (Pods)

Nginx is running on Kubernetes.

With Microsoft Visual Studio Code and the Kubernetes extension you can play with Nginx Containers (pods) locally on your laptop.

When you need more capacity and want to scale-up with more Containers (Pods) for your solution, you can use Microsoft Azure Cloud with Azure Kubernetes Services

Monitor Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) with container health (Preview) and with Analytics

 


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Use the Azure Cosmos DB Emulator for local development and testing #Azure #CosmosDB #DevOps #Docker

The Azure Cosmos DB Emulator provides a local environment that emulates the Azure Cosmos DB service for development purposes. Using the Azure Cosmos DB Emulator, you can develop and test your application locally, without creating an Azure subscription or incurring any costs. When you’re satisfied with how your application is working in the Azure Cosmos DB Emulator, you can switch to using an Azure Cosmos DB account in the cloud.

The Azure Cosmos DB Emulator for DevOps is easy to install :

Download de MSI

Docker Hub

GitHub

 

You can Attach Azure CosmosDB Emulator in Visual Studio Code 😉

When your development and testing in Azure CosmosDB Emulator is Done and Ready
for the Cloud, you can Move it to CosmosDB in Azure.

More information on Microsoft Azure CosmosDB Emulator on Docs.

Here you see What’s New in Azure Cosmos DB Video :

Lot of Success with Azure CosmosDB !


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Free E-book Introduction to Windows #Containers #Winserv #Docker #DevOps

With the introduction of container support in Windows Server 2016, we open a world of opportunities
that takes traditional monolithic applications on a journey to modernize them for better agility.
Containers are a stepping stone that can help IT organizations understand what key items in modern
IT environments, such as DevOps, Agile, Scrum, Infrastructure as Code, Continuous Integration, and
Continuous Deployment, to name just a few, can do and how these organizations can adopt all of
these elements and more to their enterprises.
As a result of Microsoft’s strong strategic partnership with Docker—the de facto standard in container
management software—enterprises can minimize the time required to onboard and run Windows Containers.
Docker presents a single API surface and standardizes tooling for working across public
and private container solutions as well as Linux and Windows Container deployments.

Download this awesome Introduction to Windows Containers E-book here

Microsoft Azure Containers in the Cloud


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Docker CE for Windows10 Edge and #Kubernetes Feature Overview #Docker #Containers #DevOps

Docker CE for Windows is Docker designed to run on Windows 10. It is a native Windows application that provides an easy-to-use development environment for building, shipping, and running dockerized apps. Docker CE for Windows uses Windows-native Hyper-V virtualization and networking and is the fastest and most reliable way to develop Docker apps on Windows. Docker CE for Windows supports running both Linux and Windows Docker containers.

You can download Docker CE for Windows (Edge) here

After you installed Docker for Windows CE (Edge) on Windows 10, go to docker Settings for activating the New Feature Kubernetes..

Select Enable Kubernetes.
(I selected also Show system containers (Advanced ) to see more information.)

Click on Install

You can run the installation in the Background if you want.

Here you see the Status of the Kubernetes Cluster.

kubectl config get-context
Docker-for-desktop Kubernetes Cluster is active

You can see the Status in Docker Settings too.

kubectl get services

kubectl get nodes

Kubectl cluster-info

When you run docker images
You will see the Kubernetes images for the Cluster.

When you selected the Advanced feature in Docker settings earlier you can
see the running containers with Docker ps command

With Kitematic you get a GUI console to manage Docker Container Images, from here you can pull Container images from Docker HUB

Download Kitematic here and install.

 

When you installed Kitematic you can see on your left all the Kubernetes Containers and when you select a running Container you can see the active logs.

More settings to Explore.

When you start Powershell in Administrator modus, you can use the kubectl command line interface and with –help you get the information on the Kubernetes commands. Here you find more information with examples at Kubernetes site

With Microsoft Visual Studio Code you can use the Docker for Windows CE Edge Kubernetes Cluster to Develop your Apps.

Intstall the Visual Studio Code Kubernetes Tools extension.

Install Kubernetes-Snippets is handy for Developing

When your Kubernetes local project is successful, you can deploy an Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) or a Microsoft Azure Container Service to run your project in the Cloud for production.

Azure Container Service (AKS)
Azure Container Service (AKS) manages your hosted Kubernetes environment, making it quick and easy to deploy and manage containerized applications without container orchestration expertise. It also eliminates the burden of ongoing operations and maintenance by provisioning, upgrading, and scaling resources on demand, without taking your applications offline.

Here you find more information on Microsoft Azure Container Services for Kubernetes

Hope this overview helps you with developing apps in Containers with Docker, Kubernetes and Azure.


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Registration is open for #Microsoft Tech Summit Amsterdam 2018 #Azure #Cloud #MSTechSummit

Build your cloud skills
Free technical learning event with Microsoft’s top cloud engineers across Azure and Microsoft 365. Whether you’re developing innovative apps or delivering optimized solutions, Microsoft Tech Summit can help evolve your skills, deepen your expertise, and grow your career.

Customize your learning
Whether you’re already cloud-savvy or just getting started, there is something for everyone. Discover the latest trends, tools, and product roadmaps at more than 80 sessions covering a range of focus areas and topics – from keynotes and breakouts to hands-on labs.

Connect with experts
Take advantage of the event Hub, a gathering place where you can learn, network, meet partners, visit the community theater, and more! You’ll also have access to experts who can help you get the most out of the cloud – ask your toughest questions, share best practices, and provide feedback.

Get inspired
The cloud is changing expectations – and transforming the way we live and work. Learn how Microsoft’s cloud platform can help you lead your organization through real digital transformation – and shape your future.

Build your cloud skills with the latest in Azure and Microsoft 365 at a free, technical learning event for IT professionals and developers.
March 28-29, 2018
Register here

Here you find the Microsoft Tech Summit 2018 Catalog sessions

See you at this Awesome Microsoft Tech Summit Event in Amsterdam 😉 #MVPbuzz