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Microsoft Hybrid Cloud blogsite about Management


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Managing and Working with #Azure Network Security Groups (NSG) #Security #IaC #AzureDevOps

Microsoft Azure Network Security Group (NSG)

When you are implementing your Microsoft Azure Design like a HUB-Spoke model you have to deal with security of your Azure environment (Virtual Datacenter). One of them are Network Security Groups to protect your Virtual networks and make communication between Azure subnets possible in a Secure Azure Virtual Datacenter.

You really have to plan your Azure Virtual networks and implement it by Architectural Design. Now I’m writing about Azure Network Security Groups which is important, but there are more items to deal with like :

  1.  Naming Conventions in your Azure Virtual Datacenter
  2.  Azure Subscriptions ( who is Owner, Contributor, or Reader? )
  3.  Azure Regions ( Where is my Datacenter in the world? )
  4.  Azure VNET and Sub-Nets ( IP-addresses )
  5.  Security of your Virtual Networks ( Traffic filtering, Routing )
  6.  Azure Connectivity ( VNET Peering between Azure Subscriptions, VPN Gateway )
  7.  Permissions (RBAC)
  8.  Azure Policy ( Working with Blue prints )

Here you can read more about these Microsoft Azure items

How to Manage Microsoft Azure Network Security Groups (NSG) ?

IMPORTANT: Before you start with Azure Network Security Groups, test every ARM JSON Script first in your Dev-Test Azure Subscription before you do production. Talk with your Cloud Administrators, because when you implement Infrastructure as Code (IaC) and work with ARM Templates you can delete manual settings in NSG’s for example, which will give you troubles like no protocol communication between subnets.

When you start new in Microsoft Azure, It’s easy to make your Azure security baseline for all of your Network Security Groups (NSG’s) by Azure Resource Manager (ARM) templates.

When you have a Microsoft Azure HUB-Spoke model with for example four Azure Subscriptions and a lot of Azure Virtual Networks – Subnets, you got a lot of NSG’s to manage and you don’t want to manage those manually. So there are different ways to manage Azure Network Security Groups via ARM Templates. For example :

ARM Templates from the Azure Portal

Make your ARM Baseline template.

Edit your parameters and Deploy.

Here you saw a standard Virtual Machine Deployment, but you can add of course all of your Azure Resource Manager templates here including your NSG Base Line template. In this way your deployments are documented ( Scripts).

Another awesome solution is Microsoft Azure DevOps for your Deployments in Azure.

Azure DevOps Services is a cloud service for collaborating on code development. It provides an integrated set of features that you access through your web browser or IDE client. The features are included, as follows:

  • Git repositories for source control of your code
  • Build and release services to support continuous integration and delivery of your apps
  • Agile tools to support planning and tracking your work, code defects, and issues using Kanban and Scrum methods
  • Many tools to test your apps, including manual/exploratory testing, load testing, and continuous testing
  • Highly customizable dashboards for sharing progress and trends
  • Built-in wiki for sharing information with your team

The Azure DevOps ecosystem also provides support for adding extensions and integrating with other popular services, such as: Campfire, Slack, Trello, UserVoice, and more, and developing your own custom extensions.
Choose Azure DevOps Services when you want the following results:

  • Quick set up
  • Maintenance-free operations
  • Easy collaboration across domains
  • Elastic scale
  • Rock-solid security

You’ll also have access to cloud load testing, cloud build servers, and application insights.

Azure DevOps Repo for your Templates

From here you can make your Infrastructure as Code (IaC) Pipelines together with your Cloud Administrator Team 😉

When you have your Azure DevOps Private Repository in place and you like to work with Visual Studio for example, you can connect to your Repo and Check-in your NSG ARM Script but Deploy with Visual Studio to your Azure Virtual Datacenter.

Azure NSG Template Deployment via Visual Studio

Microsoft Visual Studio 2019 Preview is available for download here

Here you can download Microsoft Visual Studio Community Edition

And there is Microsoft Open Source Visual Studio Code

Azure DevOps Repo in Visual Studio Code.

Microsoft Visual Studio Code work with Extensions :

Azure DevOps Repo Extension

Azure DevOps Pipelines Extension

So you see there are enough ways to deploy ARM Templates and this is not all, because you can also use Azure Cloudshell for example or other CLI command-line interfaces. But now we want to set the NSG Baseline for our Azure Subscription. A good start is to see the possibilities in the JSON scripting for Network Security Groups.
Here you find the settings and explanation of Azure Components.

For Microsoft Azure NSG Template :

Azure NSG Baseline Template

To create a Microsoft.Network/networkSecurityGroups resource, add the following JSON to the resources section of your template.
The Microsoft Azure Quick Create Templates on Github can help you to make your own NSG Template for example.

————————————————————————–

“apiVersion”: “2017-06-01”,
“type”: “Microsoft.Network/networkSecurityGroups”,
“name”: “[parameters(‘parkingzoneNSGName’)]”,
“location”: “[parameters(‘location’)]”,
“properties”: {
“securityRules”: [
/* {
“name”: “Allow_RDP_Internet”,
“properties”: {
“description”: “Allow RDP”,
“protocol”: “Tcp”,
“sourcePortRange”: “*”,
“destinationPortRange”: “3389”,
“sourceAddressPrefix”: “Internet”,
“destinationAddressPrefix”: “*”,
“access”: “Allow”,
“priority”: 500,
“direction”: “Inbound”
}, */
{
“name”: “AllowAzureCloudWestEuropeOutBound”,
“properties”: {
“protocol”: “*”,
“sourcePortRange”: “*”,
“destinationPortRange”: “*”,
“sourceAddressPrefix”: “*”,
“destinationAddressPrefix”: “AzureCloud.WestEurope”,
“access”: “Allow”,
“priority”: 999,
“direction”: “Outbound”
}
},
{
“name”: “DenyInternetOutBound”,
“properties”: {
“protocol”: “*”,
“sourcePortRange”: “*”,
“destinationPortRange”: “*”,
“sourceAddressPrefix”: “*”,
“destinationAddressPrefix”: “Internet”,
“access”: “Deny”,
“priority”: 2000,
“direction”: “Outbound”
}
}
]
}
},

————————————————————–

By Default is Internet available in a NSG ! So here you see that Internet is not allowed only the AzureCloud West Europe resources because some Azure SDK Component work via ” Public internet” ( Microsoft IP-Addresses).
(RDP protocol is marked and not set in this example for Security reasons)

Internet by Default Rules, so you must set your security Rules !

Conclusion :

You really have to implement Azure Security by Design, make your Base-line with ARM Templates in a Private Repo for your Azure Network Security Groups with the Correct RBAC Configuration for your Cloud Administrator Team. Don’t make them manually and do settings manually when you have a lot of NSG’s ! Versions of your ARM templates are documented in your Repository 😉
Test Always first in a Dev-Test Azure Subscription or in Azure DevOps with a Test plan before you implement in Production.

 

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#Microsoft Azure virtual datacenter HUB-Spoke Model: A network perspective #Cloud #Azure #Security

Microsoft Azure HUB-Spoke Model

When you have your Microsoft Azure Architectural Design in place like a HUB-Spoke model this Microsoft documentation can help you with the Security and networking design in Microsoft Azure Cloud services.

The Virtual Data Center (VDC) isn’t just the application workloads in the cloud. It’s also the network, security, management, and infrastructure. Examples are DNS and directory services. It usually provides a private connection back to an on-premises network or datacenter. As more and more workloads move to Azure, it’s important to think about the supporting infrastructure and objects that these workloads are placed in. Think carefully about how resources are structured to avoid the proliferation of hundreds of workload islands that must be managed separately with independent data flow, security models, and compliance challenges.

Read this Awesome Microsoft Azure Virtual Data Center documentation from a Network perspective here

Conclusion :

When you have your Microsoft Azure High Level Design, get your security and network in Azure in place in a manageable way for your Cloud Administrators and your Business. Here are some tips:

  • Understand the data workflows in your Azure Virtual Data Center.
  • Make a Detailed network and security design (Low level)
  • Keep it Simple but Secure.
  • Before you go into production, do a Security assessment (Pentest) by 3rd party Professionals
    ( For example via Company CQURE )

 


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Take a Deep Dive with this SQL Server 2017 Administration Ebook #SQL #SQL2017 #Azure #dba

Introduction

The velocity of change for the Microsoft SQL Server DBA has increased this decade. The span
between the releases of SQL Server 2016 and 2017 was only 16 months, the fastest new release
ever. Gone are the days when DBAs had between three to five years to soak in and adjust to new
features in the engine and surrounding technologies.
This book is written and edited by SQL Server experts with two goals in mind: to deliver a solid
foundational skillset for all of the topics covered in SQL Server configuration and administration,
and also to deliver awareness and functional, practical knowledge for the dramatic number
of new features introduced in SQL Server 2016 and 2017. We haven’t avoided new content—
even content that stretched the boundaries of writing deadlines with late-breaking new releases.
You will be presented with not only the “how” of new features, but also the “why” and the
“when” for their use.

Go Deep Dive with this Awesome SQL Server 2017 Ebook 😉

Download the Custom excerpt Inside Out SQL Server 2017 Administration Ebook here


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Installation of #AzureDevOps Server 2019 RC1 for your Team Work #DevOps #Winserv

What is Azure DevOps Server?

Collaborative software development tools for the entire team

Previously known as Team Foundation Server (TFS), Azure DevOps Server is a set of collaborative software development tools, hosted on-premises. Azure DevOps Server integrates with your existing IDE or editor, enabling your cross-functional team to work effectively on projects of all sizes.

In the following Step-by-Step Guide we will install Microsoft Azure DevOps Server 2019 RC1

 

Start the Wizard to Configure the Azure DevOps Server

Choose your Deployment Type

Choose your Scenario

Select your language

Here you can choose for your SQL Backend

Click on edit for your Site settings of Azure DevOps

Click on Next to complete

Your Microsoft Azure DevOps Windows Server 2019 RC1 is running for your Team.

Azure DevOps Community Project 😉

Here you can do your settings, like in Azure DevOps.

Azure DevOps Server Administration Console

The installation of Microsoft Azure DevOps Windows Server 2019 RC is straight forward and Great for On-premises when you can’t use Internet.

Here you find more information on Microsoft Docs to get Started Today for your Business

JOIN Azure DevOps Community Group on LinkedIn


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#Microsoft Azure Hub-Spoke model by Enterprise Design 3 of 4 Data Migration #Azure #SQL

Hyper-V Clusters front tier with SQL Clusters in the Backend

SQL assessment and Data Migration to Azure

This blogpost is about SQL assessment and Data Migration to your Azure design in the Cloud in a secure way.
Before you begin with your Data assessment and getting your workloads together with Microsoft Azure ServiceMaps, I wrote these blogposts about Microsoft Azure HUB – Spoke model by Enterprise Design :

  1. Microsoft Azure Hub-Spoke model by Enterprise Design 1 of 4
  2. Microsoft Azure Policy and BluePrints Overview (Extra Blogpost)
  3. Microsoft Azure Hub-Spoke model by Enterprise Design 2 of 4 “Lift and Shift”

For Microsoft SQL databases there are different Azure Solutions in the Cloud possible, but first you need to know which versions of SQL do you have and how are they running now in your Datacenter?

SQL 2014 Virtual Guest Cluster with Shared VHDX

Here you can see a totally different SQL Cluster configuration, running on Hyper-V instead of physical Server nodes like you can see in the first picture with SQL 2008 R2 Clusters.
When you have a CMDB of your SQL versions running in your Datacenter, you can compare it with these SQL versions on this Great website.

What is also important to know, in which compatibility mode is your SQL Server running? Because you can have a recent SQL version but it’s running in a old compatibility version for the application.

SQL versions with Compatibility matrix

When you have all the insights of your SQL workload on-premises like :

Then you want to know to which Microsoft Azure SQL solution will I migrate my data ?

When you do a “Lift and Shift” first to the Azure-HUB subscription for the complete workload (Virtual Machines + SQL Databases) then you can implement SQL Always-On in Azure.

SQL Always-ON Availability Group

More information about SQL Always-On in Availability Groups in Azure

Or you can migrate to Azure SQL (PaaS) directly.
Later in this blogpost you see the Options with Microsoft Azure Data Migration Assistant (DMA)

Test & Acceptance and Production Azure Spoke

When you have “Lift and Shift” your workload to the Azure-HUB landing zone, then you can do the Optimize of your solutions included SQL to the Test & Acceptance and Production Spoke. For this it’s important where and how your SQL Backend is landing in Microsoft Azure by Design.

Microsoft Azure Data Migration Assistant (DMA)

Data Migration Assistant (DMA) enables you to upgrade to a modern data platform by detecting compatibility issues that can impact database functionality on your new version of SQL Server. It recommends performance and reliability improvements for your target environment. It allows you to not only move your schema and data, but also uncontained objects from your source server to your target server.

Azure SQL Data Migration Assistant

In the following Step-by-Step Guide we will Migrate a SQL 2016 SP2 Database to a Microsoft Azure SQL Database (PaaS):

first you have to download Microsoft Azure SQL Data Migration Assistant here

Click Next.

Click Next

Click Install

Ready for Assessments and Migrations.

  1. Here you can choose between the Assessment or the Migration.
  2. Here you can Choose for your Azure Target SQL Solution :
    – Azure SQL Database
    – Azure SQL Database Managed Instance
    – SQL Server on Azure Virtual Machines
    – SQL Server

Select the options for the Assessment.

In the following steps we will migrate the SQL 2016 SP2 database to Azure SQL :

Connect to the local SQL Instance and Select your Database

Connect and select your Azure SQL Database.

Select the Schema objects to migrate into Azure SQL

Here you see the Script to Deploy Schema.

Schema migration in progress

Schema Migration is Done, now you Click on Migrate Data

Select the Tables to Migrate and click on Start data Migration

Data Migration in progress

The SQL 2016 SP2 Migration from On-premisses to Azure SQL is Successful Completed 🙂

Connected to Azure SQL Database with my Data.

The SQL Query editor is a browser query tool that provides an efficient and lightweight way to execute SQL queries on your Azure SQL Database or Azure SQL Data Warehouse without leaving the Azure portal. This quickstart demonstrates how to use the Query editor to connect to a SQL database, and then use Transact-SQL statements to query, insert, update, and delete data in the database.

Here is my Data in Azure SQL with Query Editor of the Azure Portal.

This is just one Scenario with Azure SQL Data Migration Assistant. What you have learned is that you must have your Azure SQL Solution in place by Architectural Design before you do the SQL Data Migration.

Here you find more information about Data Migration to Microsoft Azure :

Microsoft Azure Data Migration Guide

 

Here you find Microsoft Azure Migration Center

Conclusion :

Microsoft Azure Architecture design like a Hub-Spoke model for example is important to have in place before you do your Data Migration to the Azure Cloud. You got different SQL Solutions in Microsoft Azure, like SQL Always-On in availability Groups and Microsoft Azure SQL Database with or without Managed Instances. Choose for the best scenario in your own Design. My next blogpost in this Serie will be on Optimize your Azure workloads
How can you make your solution smarter, more intelligent for your business and in Azure costs cheaper with Great benefits! Here we can think out of the box to get the best 😉


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#Microsoft Azure Hub-Spoke model by Enterprise Design 2 of 4 Lift and Shift #Azure #Hyperv #VMware

Microsoft Azure Hybrid Cloud Architecture HUB-Spoke Model

Microsoft Azure Hub-Spoke model

This blogpost about Microsoft Azure Hub-Spoke model by Enterprise Design 2 of 4 “Lift and Shift” is part of a Datacenter transition to Microsoft Azure Intelligent Cloud. It’s talking about Azure Architecture, Security, Assessment, Azure Policy, and implementation of the design. Here you find the first blogposts :

It’s important for your business to have your Azure Architectural design with Security in place before you start your “Lift and Shift” actions, think about Identity Management and Provisioning, RBAC for your Administrators and Super Users with Two-Factor Authentication. Security with Network Security Groups and Firewalls 

Azure Multi-Factor-Authentication (MFA)

Microsoft Azure Hub-Spoke model : “Lift and Shift”

 

Microsoft Azure HUB subscription for “Lift and Shift”

To “Lift and Shift” to the Azure HUB Subscription we have the following in place by Design :

  1. Azure Scaffold and Hierarchy (Governance)
  2. Virtual Networks (VNET) with the Subnets and IP-Number plan
  3. ExpressRoute VPN Connection with a backup failover Site-2-Site VPN connection to Azure.
  4. Resource Groups, like Active Directory, ADFS Farm, Authentication, SQL Backend.
  5. Resource Policies
  6. Resource Locks
  7. Network Security Groups (NSG)
  8. DNS
  9. Azure Firewall
  10. Azure internal Load Balancers.
  11. Azure Storage Accounts
  12. Azure Virtual Machine sizes
  13. Azure Virtual Machine Image
  14. Managed Disks and Encryption.
  15. Redundancy for Virtual Machines
  16. Azure Key Vault for Encryption.
  17. Azure Recovery Vault ( Backup)
  18. Azure Policy
  19. Managed Identities, Azure MFA, RBAC,ADFS
  20. Azure Monitor
  21. Azure Naming Convention
  22. Azure Tagging
  23. Azure Cost Management
  24. ARM (JSON) Deployment template (for New requests)

To help you more with your Azure Virtual Datacenter have a look here

 

Azure Hierarchy

Azure Scaffold

When creating a building, scaffolding is used to create the basis of a structure. The scaffold guides the general outline and provides anchor points for more permanent systems to be mounted. An enterprise scaffold is the same: a set of flexible controls and Azure capabilities that provide structure to the environment, and anchors for services built on the public cloud. It provides the builders (IT and business groups) a foundation to create and attach new services keeping speed of delivery in mind. Read more hereI did the “Lift and Shift” between quotes because it’s important to follow the process workflow to be successful in your Datacenter transition to the Microsoft Azure Cloud.

 

Here you find all the Microsoft Azure Migration information

 

 

App Migration to Azure: Your options explained by Jeremy Winter

The Azure Migrate service assesses on-premises workloads for migration to Azure. The service assesses the migration suitability of on-premises machines, performs performance-based sizing, and provides cost estimations for running on-premises machines in Azure. If you’re contemplating lift-and-shift migrations, or are in the early assessment stages of migration, this service is for you. After the assessment, you can use services such as Azure Site Recovery and Azure Database Migration Service, to migrate the machines to Azure.

In your datacenter you got all kind of different workloads and solutions like :

  • Hyper-V Clusters
  • VMware Clusters
  • SQL Clusters
  • Print Clusters
  • File Clusters
  • Web Farm
  • Two or three tiers solutions
  • Physical Servers
  • Different Storage solutions

When you do your Datacenter Assessment it’s important to get your workloads visible, because “Lift and Shift” with Azure Site Recovery (ASR) of a Virtual Machine is an different scenario then SQL database migration to Azure. That’s why Microsoft has different tooling like :

To get your dependencies in your Datacenter on the map, Microsoft has Azure Service Maps.

Service Map automatically discovers application components on Windows and Linux systems and maps the communication between services. With Service Map, you can view your servers in the way that you think of them: as interconnected systems that deliver critical services. Service Map shows connections between servers, processes, inbound and outbound connection latency, and ports across any TCP-connected architecture, with no configuration required other than the installation of an agent.

This is very handy to get insides of your Datacenter communication workloads.

More information on using Azure Service Maps here

Installation example of Hyper-V Virtual Machines with ASR

In the following step-by-step guide we will install the Azure Site Recovery Agent on a Hyper-V host and migrate a virtual machine to Microsoft azure in a “Lift and Shift” way.

First create a Recovery Services Vault => Click Add.

Then you go to your new created Recovery Vault and click on Getting started for Site Recovery. => Prepare infrastructure and follow the steps.

When you have selected Hyper-V VM to Azure, the next step is the ASR Deployment Planner tool kit. Here you find more information on Azure Site Recovery Deployment Planner user guide for Hyper-V-to-Azure production deployments.

Then in step 3 you will make your Hyper-V Site in Microsoft azure with the Right Hyper-V Servers.

Give your Hyper-V Site the right name, especially when you have a lot of Hyper-V Clusters with Different workloads.

Here is where the registration begins with the Azure Site Recovery (ASR) Agent installation on your Hyper-V Host.
Follow the five steps and make sure your Hyper-V Node can access Azure via secure port 443(https) via Proxy or firewall rules.

Install as Administrator the AzureSiteRecoveryProvider.exe file on the Hyper-V host.

Click on Next

Choose your Installation location and Click on Install.

The Azure Site Recovery agent is installed and need to be registered with your Azure Recovery Vault.
For this you need the key file from the Azure portal to download at step 4. Click on Register.

Browse to your downloaded key file from the Azure Portal Recovery Vault and click on Next.

When you have a proxy you can select that, otherwise select Next.

Now your Azure ASR Agent on Hyper-V is registered with your Azure Site Recovery Vault.

In the Azure Portal you will see your Hyper-V Node, in my Demo LAB it’s WAC01.MVPLAB.LOCAL.

In the next step you can choose an existing Storage account, or a new one with different specifications.

Check also after storage your network in azure.

In this step we create the replication policy.

Set your own settings.

The Replication policy is added to the configuration.

When you click on OK the Infrastructure is done.

We are now going to enable the replication :

Select your Source and location.

here you select your target Storage account, Resource Group and Network.

The connections are made between Hyper-V, ASR Vault and Storage.

Select the Virtual Machine(s) from the Hyper-V host to replicate for migration with ASR

Configure the properties.

Click on OK

From here the Replication will begin from Hyper-V Host to Azure  🙂

Azure Sire Recovery Replication Job status.

Replicated item(s)

To make your recovery plan and do the failover for migration to azure, you have to wait until the first replication is done for 100%.

Azure Site Recovery Plan for failover (Migration)

Make recovery Plan.

Click OK

The Target in the recovery plan can only be selected when the first replication is done.

Overview of the Azure Site Recovery Migration failover.

From the Hyper-V Host you can pause or see the replication health status.

Hyper-V Health Status

Azure Migrate Virtual Machines using Azure Site Recovery video with Microsoft Jeff Woolsey

Microsoft Azure Data Migration Assistant

To migrate your SQL Backend to Microsoft Azure, use this step-by-step instructions help you perform your first assessment for migrating to on-premises SQL Server, SQL Server running on an Azure VM, or Azure SQL Database, by using Data Migration Assistant.

Conclusion :

“Lift and Shift” Migration of your complete datacenter exists of different scenarios for your workloads to Microsoft Azure. With that said, Microsoft has for each scenario tooling available to get the job done. It’s all about a good Architectural Design, Security in place, People and process to get your Intelligent Azure Cloud up and running for your Business.

Next Blogpost Microsoft Azure Hub-Spoke model by Enterprise Design 3 of 4 :
SQL assessment and Data Migration to Azure


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#Microsoft Azure Hub-Spoke model by Enterprise Design 1 of 4 #Azure #Cloud

 

Azure Hub-Spoke Architecture

Microsoft Azure Hub-Spoke Architecture

This Enterprise reference architecture shows how to implement a hub-spoke topology in Azure. The hub is a virtual network (VNet) in Azure that acts as a central point of connectivity to your on-premises network. The spokes are VNets that peer with the hub, and can be used to isolate workloads. Traffic flows between the on-premises datacenter and the hub through an ExpressRoute or VPN gateway connection.

We only use the Azure Private peering

For this Hybrid Cloud Strategy we made four Microsoft Azure Subscriptions via the EA Portal :

  1. Azure HUB Subscription for the connectivity via Azure ExpressRoute to On-premises Datacenter.
  2. Azure Spoke 1 for Production workload and Cloud Services
  3. Azure Spoke 2 for Test and Acceptance Cloud Services
  4. Azure Spoke 3 for Future plans

The naming convention rules and restrictions for Azure resources and a baseline set of recommendations for naming conventions. You can use these recommendations as a starting point for your own conventions specific to your needs.

The choice of a name for any resource in Microsoft Azure is important because:

  • It is difficult to change a name later.
  • Names must meet the requirements of their specific resource type.

Consistent naming conventions make resources easier to locate. They can also indicate the role of a resource in a solution.The key to success with naming conventions is establishing and following them across your applications and organizations.

Azure connectivity and RBAC Identity

This tenant is federated with via ADFS and Azure Connect to Office 365. Identity management is provisioned
via Microsoft Identity Manager 2016 (MIM2016). With this already in place, we can Configure Microsoft Azure RBAC in the subscriptions.

Access management for cloud resources is a critical function for any organization that is using the cloud. Role-based access control (RBAC) helps you manage who has access to Azure resources, what they can do with those resources, and what areas they have access to.

RBAC is an authorization system built on Azure Resource Manager that provides fine-grained access management of resources in Azure.

Business Development

For Business Development we have a separated Active Directory in one forest and also federated via ADFS to Microsoft Office 365. For this environment we build one Azure subscription with a temporary Site-to-Site VPN connection to On-premises datacenter for the “Lift and Shift” migration via Azure-Site-Recovery (ASR)

S2S VPN IKE v2 tunnel with Cisco and Azure.

Azure Virtual Networks

Next step is to build the connections between the Azure HUB Subscription and the Azure Spoke subscription(s) when every Microsoft Azure subscription has It’s own Virtual Network (VNET). This is called VNET peering.

Virtual network peering enables you to seamlessly connect two Azure virtual networks. Once peered, the virtual networks appear as one, for connectivity purposes. The traffic between virtual machines in the peered virtual networks is routed through the Microsoft backbone infrastructure, much like traffic is routed between virtual machines in the same virtual network, through private IP addresses only. Azure supports:

  • VNet peering – connecting VNets within the same Azure region
  • Global VNet peering – connecting VNets across Azure regions

Here you see my step-by-step VNET peering creation from HUB to Spoke 1 :

Go to the VNET of the Azure HUB Subscription. and then to Peerings => Add.

Here you make the connection with Spoke 1 Azure subscription.

For Azure HUB is Peering to Spoke 1 Done.

Now we go to the VNET of Azure Subscription Spoke 1 to make the connection.

Go to VNET => Peerings => Click on Add in the Azure Spoke 1 Subscription

Connect here to the Azure HUB

The VNET Peering between Azure HUB subscription and Spoke 1 is Connected.

In this order you have to make the other VNET Peerings from the Azure HUB subscription to the other Spoke Subscriptions so that the network connectivity between VNETs is working. Because we have the Azure Internet Edge in the HUB for the other subscriptions.

In the Azure Reference Architecture we also do Security by Design in the Cloud with Firewall and Azure Network Security Groups (NSG) and every Azure component get it’s own Tag for Security Groups and Billing – Usage.

Azure Storage

In every Microsoft Azure Subscription (HUB and Spoke ) we created a Storage Account. You can choose for different kind of storage in Microsoft Azure.

Durable and highly available. Redundancy ensures that your data is safe in the event of transient hardware failures. You can also opt to replicate data across datacenters or geographical regions for additional protection from local catastrophe or natural disaster. Data replicated in this way remains highly available in the event of an unexpected outage.
Secure. All data written to Azure Storage is encrypted by the service. Azure Storage provides you with fine-grained control over who has access to your data.
Scalable. Azure Storage is designed to be massively scalable to meet the data storage and performance needs of today’s applications.
Managed. Microsoft Azure handles maintenance and any critical problems for you.
Accessible. Data in Azure Storage is accessible from anywhere in the world over HTTP or HTTPS. Microsoft provides SDKs for Azure Storage in a variety of languages — .NET, Java, Node.js, Python, PHP, Ruby, Go, and others — as well as a mature REST API. Azure Storage supports scripting in Azure PowerShell or Azure CLI. And the Azure portal and Azure Storage Explorer offer easy visual solutions for working with your data.

Azure Storage includes these data services:
Azure Blobs: A massively scalable object store for text and binary data.
Azure Files: Managed file shares for cloud or on-premises deployments.
Azure Queues: A messaging store for reliable messaging between application components.
Azure Tables: A NoSQL store for schemaless storage of structured data.

Creating your Azure Storage accounts by Design.

One of our Architecture Security by Design policy, is to Encrypt all the storage in Azure via Microsoft Azure Key vault.

Deploying Azure IaaS Virtual Machine with ARM Templates

Enterprise organizations with more then ten employees managing IT datacenters are working by process and order to do the job for the business. When they are all using the Azure Portal and deploy Virtual Machines manually you will get a mess and things can go wrong. In Microsoft Azure you have the Azure Resource Manager for deploying  JSON ARM Templates. With these Azure Resource Manager Templates you can automate your workload deployments in Microsoft Azure. For example : We build a JSON template to deploy a Windows Server in the right Azure Subscription in the right Azure Resource Group and with the following extensions to it :

  • Antimalware agent installed
  • Domain joined in the right OU (Active Directory)
  • Azure Log analytics agent installed ( Connected to Azure Monitor and SCOM )
  • Encryption by default.

Using with our Azure naming conventions and Azure policy we always deploy consistent without making mistakes or by wrong typing in the Azure portal. When you write and make your ARM templates for different workloads, you can store them in Azure DevOps Repo ( Repository) and you can connect your private repo to GitHub.

Making ARM templates works really Awesome with Microsoft Visual Studio Code which is opensource and free of charge. You can add your favorite VSC extensions to work with like Azure Resource Manager.

 Our Azure ARM Template to deploy Virtual Machines into Azure HUB-Spoke model with VSC

Azure monitoring and Recovery Service Vault

To manage your Azure Hybrid Cloud environment you have to monitor everything to keep in control of your Virtual Datacenter. And of course you have to plan your business continuity with Azure Recovery Services (Backup) by Design. We made in every Azure Subscription an Azure Recovery Services Vault for making Backups. This is because you don’t want backup traffic over your VNET peering’s. In the Azure HUB subscription we made a second Azure Site Recovery (ASR) Vault for the “Lift & Shift” migration of On-premises Virtual Machines to the landing zone in Azure HUB.

With Microsoft Azure Monitor we use Log Analytics and Service maps and with the same OMS agent on the Virtual Machine, we still can use Microsoft System Center Operation Manager (SCOM) connected to the same agent 🙂

When you have 45 locations, 45.000 students with BYOD and 10.000 Managed workstations, you will monitor 24 x 7 to keep everything running for your Business. Monitoring Express Route with a Backup connection is a must for your Hybrid Virtual Datacenter. Here you have more information about monitoring Express Route Circuit

Monitoring our Express Route

With this all installed in Microsoft Azure by Design, we have the policy Security First !

Microsoft Azure Security Center

Azure Security Center provides unified security management and advanced threat protection across hybrid cloud workloads. With Security Center, you can apply security policies across your workloads, limit your exposure to threats, and detect and respond to attacks.

We are already installing Azure Threat Protection (ATP) for our On-premises Datacenter for Security.

Azure Security Center

We still have a lot to configure in Microsoft Azure to get the Basic Architecture Design in place. When that is done, I will make three more blogposts about this datacenter transformation :

  • “Lift and Shift” migration with ASR for Virtual Machines on Hyper-V and VMware.
  • SQL assessment and Data Migration to Azure
  • Optimize of all Workloads in Microsoft Azure.

Hope this blogpost will help you too with your Datacenter transition to Microsoft Azure Cloud.