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#Azure IoT Pipeline with Microsoft #AzureDevOps Project #IoT #Code #Apps #SmartCities

Azure IoT Edge – Hub with Azure DevOps Pipeline

Configure continuous integration (CI) and continuous delivery (CD) for your IoT Edge application with DevOps Projects. DevOps Projects simplifies the initial configuration of a build and release pipeline in Azure Pipelines.

In the following steps you can see how easy it is to build your Continuous integration and continuous deployment to Azure IoT Edge with DevOps Project :

Select Simple IoT

Click on Next.

From here you set your Azure DevOps organization to your Azure IoT Hub. Click on additional settings

In additional settings you can set :

  • Azure Resource Group
  • Location ( region)
  • Container Registry
  • Container Registry name
  • Container registry SKU
  • Container Location
  • IoT Hub of Edge Devices
  • IoT Hub Location

Select Container Registry Plan

Azure Container Registry allows you to store images for all types of container deployments including DC/OS, Docker Swarm, Kubernetes, and Azure services such as App Service, Batch, Service Fabric, and others. Your DevOps team can manage the configuration of apps isolated from the configuration of the hosting environment.
More information about Azure Container Registry and pricing

Azure DevOps Project will do the rest of the deployment.

Of course Infrastructure as Code (IaC) is possible by ARM JSON Template.

Save the template for later.

here you got your ARM Templates.

Later you will see when you complete the deployment, that your JSON ARM template is in Azure DevOps Repo.
You can connect your Azure DevOps Repo via the portal but also via Visual Studio and Visual Studio Code.

The resources coming into myiotpipeline-rg

MyIOTPipeline-IoTHub is created.

MyIOTPipelineACR Container Registry is created.

MyIOTPipeline with Azure DevOps is created 🙂

Your Continuous integration and continuous deployment to Azure IoT Edge is deployed and active. Now you have your Azure Pipeline in place to continuously update your IoT Device App. From here you can go to Azure DevOps Project Homepage.

Via Agent phase you can see all the jobs of the deployment.

Azure DevOps Pipeline Release

here we have Azure DevOps Repos

Azure DevOps Services includes free unlimited private Git repos, so Azure Repos is easy to try out. Git is the most commonly used version control system today and is quickly becoming the standard for version control. Git is a distributed version control system, meaning that your local copy of code is a complete version control repository. These fully functional local repositories make it easy to work offline or remotely. You commit your work locally, and then sync your copy of the repository with the copy on the server.
Git in Azure Repos is standard Git. You can use the clients and tools of your choice, such as Git for Windows, Mac, partners’ Git services, and tools such as Visual Studio and Visual Studio Code.

All the Azure Resources for the IoT Edge Pipeline with Azure DevOps.

When you have your Azure DevOps Pipeline with IoT Edge devices running, you can monitor your pipeline with Analytics inside Azure DevOps.

Click Next.

Click on Install Analytics.

Select the right Azure DevOps Organization for your IoT Edge Pipeline.

Done !

 

Analytics is now active, you can make automated test plans in Azure DevOps and see the results via Analytics.

Azure DevOps Overview Dashboard.

There are a lot of predefined Analytics Views for you shared.

An Analytics view provides a simplified way to specify the filter criteria for a Power BI report based on the Analytics Service data store. The Analytics Service provides the reporting platform for Azure DevOps.
More information about Analytics in Azure DevOps here

Easy to start with Powerbi and Azure DevOps Connector.

Planned manual testing
Plan, execute, and track scripted tests with actionable defects and end-to-end traceability. Assess quality throughout the development lifecycle by testing your desktop or web applications.

More information about making your testplan for your IoT Edge Devices Azure DevOps Pipeline

Conclusion :

When you connect Microsoft Azure IoT Edge – HUB with your Internet of Things Devices and combine it with Microsoft Azure DevOps Team to develop your Azure IoT Pipeline, then you are in fully control of Continuous integration and continuous deployment to Azure IoT Edge. From here you can make your innovations and Intelligent Cloud & Edge with Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning to your Devices. You will see that this combination will be Awesome for HealthCare, Smart Cities, Smart Buildings, Infrastructure, and the Tech Industry.

In this Microsoft article, you learn how to use the built-in Azure IoT Edge tasks for Azure Pipelines to create two pipelines for your IoT Edge solution. The first takes your code and builds the solution, pushing your module images to your container registry and creating a deployment manifest. The second deploys your modules to targeted IoT Edge devices.

Join the Azure DevOps Community on LinkedIn

Join Containers in the Cloud Community on LinkedIn

Join Microsoft Azure Monitor & Security for Hybrid IT Community on LinkedIn


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Bye Bye 2018 vs Hello 2019 #MVPbuzz #Azure #Cloud #AzureDevOps #Education #Code #Analytics

Happy New Year !

First of all Thank you for following me and Sharing Microsoft Cloud and Datacenter Management content on Social Media 🙂 Sharing & Learning Together is Better. 

Here some work I did for the Community in 2018 :

  •  I wrote 62 Blogposts in 2018 on https://mountainss.wordpress.com and shared them on LinkedIn,
    Twitter, Facebook and Microsoft Tech Community
  • Made a Blogpost Serie about :
    It’s all about your Datacenter transition to the Cloud by Design and by Security.
    Microsoft Azure Hub-Spoke model by Enterprise Design

  • Started Azure DevOps Community Group on LinkedIn
  • Together with Community Groups :  Microsoft Azure Monitor and Security for Hybrid IT and
    Containers in the Cloud

    @Jamesvandenberg
  • Welcome 577 New Followers on Twitter of the 5904 Followers 🙂
    More then 2.807.000 Tweet impressions in One year !
  • Started with Friday is MVPbuzz Day for Education to get Azure Cloud in the Classroom, working together with Teachers and Students in my Free time.
  • Working with Microsoft Learn in Teams for the Students.
  • Meetings and Speaking for Education, all about Azure and AzureStack Technologies.
  • Conferences, like the Global MVP Summit 2018, DevOps Amsterdam, Community Group meetings.
    Microsoft Ignite, Microsoft Build, Microsoft Connect events.
  • Almost every week Microsoft Product Group Intervention (PGI) sessions Online.
  • Sharing the News every Day via Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Microsoft Tech Community, Blog

But what is coming in 2019 ?

Rocking with Azure in the Classroom !

I will continue every day sharing knowledge with the Community and continue my Free work on MVPbuzz Friday for Education to get Azure Cloud Technology in the Classroom for Teachers and Students.
The trend I see for 2019 is more Infrastructure and Security by Code with Microsoft Azure DevOps
and of course you have to be in Control with Microsoft Azure Monitor

I will write a blogpost in January 2019 about Microsoft Azure Hub-Spoke model by Enterprise Design 4 of 4 : Optimize your Azure Workload.

More Items in 2019 to come :

  • Microsoft Azure Security Center for Hybrid IT
  • Windows Server 2019 in combination with Azure Cloud Services.
  • More on Containers in the Cloud
  • Azure Stack and ASDK
  • Integration with Azure Cloud.
  • API Management
  • Azure DevOps Pipelines and Collabration
  • Azure IoT for Smart Cities and Buildings combined with AI Technology

2019 will be a Great year again with New Microsoft Technologies and Features for your business.


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#Microsoft #AzureDevOps – Azure Pipelines, #Azure Boards + GitHub with @AbelSquidHead #LoECDA

Azure DevOps for CI/CD

Azure DevOps Services is a cloud service for collaborating on code development. It provides an integrated set of features that you access through your web browser or IDE client. The features are included, as follows:

  • Git repositories for source control of your code
  • Build and release services to support continuous integration and delivery of your apps
  • Agile tools to support planning and tracking your work, code defects, and issues using Kanban and Scrum methods
  • Many tools to test your apps, including manual/exploratory testing, load testing, and continuous testing
  • Highly customizable dashboards for sharing progress and trends
  • Built-in wiki for sharing information with your team

The Azure DevOps ecosystem also provides support for adding extensions and integrating with other popular services, such as: Campfire, Slack, Trello, UserVoice, and more, and developing your own custom extensions.

Start your CI/CD Pipelines Today with Azure DevOps

More information about Microsoft Azure DevOps :

Microsoft Azure DevOps Docs

Azure DevOps Community Group on LinkedIn

Azure DevOps PODCAST

and stay up-to-date on Azure DevOps via Twitter :

The #LoECDA Team

@AzureDevOps

@DonovanBrown

@AbelSquidHead

@jldeen

@damovisa

@StevenMurawski


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Installation of #AzureDevOps Server 2019 RC1 for your Team Work #DevOps #Winserv

What is Azure DevOps Server?

Collaborative software development tools for the entire team

Previously known as Team Foundation Server (TFS), Azure DevOps Server is a set of collaborative software development tools, hosted on-premises. Azure DevOps Server integrates with your existing IDE or editor, enabling your cross-functional team to work effectively on projects of all sizes.

In the following Step-by-Step Guide we will install Microsoft Azure DevOps Server 2019 RC1

 

Start the Wizard to Configure the Azure DevOps Server

Choose your Deployment Type

Choose your Scenario

Select your language

Here you can choose for your SQL Backend

Click on edit for your Site settings of Azure DevOps

Click on Next to complete

Your Microsoft Azure DevOps Windows Server 2019 RC1 is running for your Team.

Azure DevOps Community Project 😉

Here you can do your settings, like in Azure DevOps.

Azure DevOps Server Administration Console

The installation of Microsoft Azure DevOps Windows Server 2019 RC is straight forward and Great for On-premises when you can’t use Internet.

Here you find more information on Microsoft Docs to get Started Today for your Business

JOIN Azure DevOps Community Group on LinkedIn


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Download the August 2018 #Developers Guide to #Azure #Cloud

If you are a developer or architect who wants to get started with Microsoft Azure, this book is for you! Written by developers for developers, this guide will show you how to get started with Azure and which services you can use to run your applications, store your data, incorporate intelligence, build IoT apps, and deploy your solutions in a more efficient and secure way.

Download the August 2018 Update of Developers Guide to Azure E-book here

Happy Reading and Building in the Microsoft Azure Cloud with this Awesome E-book !


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Creating VM Cluster on Azure #Cloud with Terraform #IaC #Azure #Terraform #Linux #Winserv

Type az and you should see this Azure CLI

Type Terraform and you should see the terraform commands

 

Install and configure Terraform to provision VMs and other infrastructure into Azure

Before you begin with Terraform and deploying your solution to Microsoft Azure you have to install Azure CLI and Terraform for your OS.

In the following step-by-step guide we will deploy a VM Cluster with Terraform into Microsoft Azure Cloud Services.

First we open Powershell in Administrator mode :

You should have your Terraform script ready.

It’s great to edit your Terraform script in Visual Studio Code

Create a Terraform configuration file
In this section, you create a file that contains resource definitions for your infrastructure.
Create a new file named main.tf.
Copy following sample resource definitions into the newly created main.tf file:


resource “azurerm_resource_group” “test” {
name = “acctestrg”
location = “West US 2”
}

resource “azurerm_virtual_network” “test” {
name = “acctvn”
address_space = [“10.0.0.0/16”]
location = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.location}”
resource_group_name = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.name}”
}

resource “azurerm_subnet” “test” {
name = “acctsub”
resource_group_name = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.name}”
virtual_network_name = “${azurerm_virtual_network.test.name}”
address_prefix = “10.0.2.0/24”
}

resource “azurerm_public_ip” “test” {
name = “publicIPForLB”
location = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.location}”
resource_group_name = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.name}”
public_ip_address_allocation = “static”
}

resource “azurerm_lb” “test” {
name = “loadBalancer”
location = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.location}”
resource_group_name = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.name}”

frontend_ip_configuration {
name = “publicIPAddress”
public_ip_address_id = “${azurerm_public_ip.test.id}”
}
}

resource “azurerm_lb_backend_address_pool” “test” {
resource_group_name = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.name}”
loadbalancer_id = “${azurerm_lb.test.id}”
name = “BackEndAddressPool”
}

resource “azurerm_network_interface” “test” {
count = 2
name = “acctni${count.index}”
location = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.location}”
resource_group_name = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.name}”

ip_configuration {
name = “testConfiguration”
subnet_id = “${azurerm_subnet.test.id}”
private_ip_address_allocation = “dynamic”
load_balancer_backend_address_pools_ids = [“${azurerm_lb_backend_address_pool.test.id}”]
}
}

resource “azurerm_managed_disk” “test” {
count = 2
name = “datadisk_existing_${count.index}”
location = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.location}”
resource_group_name = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.name}”
storage_account_type = “Standard_LRS”
create_option = “Empty”
disk_size_gb = “1023”
}

resource “azurerm_availability_set” “avset” {
name = “avset”
location = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.location}”
resource_group_name = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.name}”
platform_fault_domain_count = 2
platform_update_domain_count = 2
managed = true
}

resource “azurerm_virtual_machine” “test” {
count = 2
name = “acctvm${count.index}”
location = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.location}”
availability_set_id = “${azurerm_availability_set.avset.id}”
resource_group_name = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.name}”
network_interface_ids = [“${element(azurerm_network_interface.test.*.id, count.index)}”]
vm_size = “Standard_DS1_v2”

# Uncomment this line to delete the OS disk automatically when deleting the VM
# delete_os_disk_on_termination = true

# Uncomment this line to delete the data disks automatically when deleting the VM
# delete_data_disks_on_termination = true

storage_image_reference {
publisher = “Canonical”
offer = “UbuntuServer”
sku = “16.04-LTS”
version = “latest”
}

storage_os_disk {
name = “myosdisk${count.index}”
caching = “ReadWrite”
create_option = “FromImage”
managed_disk_type = “Standard_LRS”
}

# Optional data disks
storage_data_disk {
name = “datadisk_new_${count.index}”
managed_disk_type = “Standard_LRS”
create_option = “Empty”
lun = 0
disk_size_gb = “1023”
}

storage_data_disk {
name = “${element(azurerm_managed_disk.test.*.name, count.index)}”
managed_disk_id = “${element(azurerm_managed_disk.test.*.id, count.index)}”
create_option = “Attach”
lun = 1
disk_size_gb = “${element(azurerm_managed_disk.test.*.disk_size_gb, count.index)}”
}

os_profile {
computer_name = “hostname”
admin_username = “testadmin”
admin_password = “Password1234!”
}

os_profile_linux_config {
disable_password_authentication = false
}

tags {
environment = “staging”
}
}


Type : terraform init

You should see this screen.

Type : az login

We now logging into Microsoft Azure subscription.

https://microsoft.com/devicelogin

Insert the code from your Powershell screen.

Now we have the Terraform INIT running and we are connected to our Azure Subscription 😉

Type : terraform plan

It will refreshing the state and getting ready for deployment.

Type : terraform apply

and then type : yes <enter>

Terraform is now creating the azure resources

Azure resource group acctestrg is made

Terraform deployment VM Cluster on Azure is Ready 😉

Azure VM Cluster is running.

When you want to remove the complete Azure VM Cluster with terraform, it’s really easy :

Type : terraform destroy

and then type : yes <enter>

Azure resources are being deleted via terraform script

Terraform destroyed the Azure VM Cluster


All Azure Resources of the VM Cluster are removed.

Hope this step-by-step guide deploying infrastructure as Code with terraform will help you with your own Cloud solutions in Microsoft azure.

Ps. don’t forget to install Visual Studio Code Azure Terraform extension and play !

#MVPbuzz



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#Build your Own Azure DevOps Project Pipeline #Cloud #Azure #DevOps #Pipeline

Microsoft Azure DevOps Projects

The Azure DevOps Project automates the setup of an entire Continuous Integration (CI) and Continuous Delivery (CD) pipeline to Azure. You can start with your existing code or use one of the provided sample applications, and then quickly deploy that application to various Azure services such as Virtual Machines, App Service, Azure Container Service, Azure SQL Database, and Azure Service Fabric.
The Azure DevOps project does all the work for the initial configuration of a DevOps pipeline including everything from setting up the initial Git repository, configuring the CI/CD pipeline, creating an Application Insights resource for monitoring, and providing a single view of the entire solution with the creation of an Azure DevOps Project dashboard on the Azure portal.

Learn how to use the Azure DevOps Project to create VSTS Release pipelines :

  1. Bring your own code with GitHub
  2. Deploy your ASP.NET App to Azure Virtual Machines
  3. Deploy your ASP.NET App and Azure SQL Database
  4. Deploy your App to Azure Container Service and Kubernetes
  5. Deploy your App to Azure Service Fabric

Microsoft Azure CI/CD Pipeline integrated with VSTS


Get started today with your Own Azure DevOps Project here