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How to Add a Native-Boot Virtual Hard Disk to the Boot Menu #Hyperv

VHDBoot

The following procedures describe how to add a native-boot virtual hard disk (VHD) to the boot menu using the BCDedit tool. If you are adding the VHD to a computer that already has a Windows® 8 installation, you will have to add a boot entry to the menu. If you are adding the VHD to a computer that is running an older version of Windows, for example Windows Server® 2008, you will have to update the system partition using the BCDboot tool and then modify the boot menu using the BCDedit tool. The .vhd file format is supported for native boot on a computer that has a Windows® 7 boot environment, but you will have to update the system partition to a Windows 8 environment to use the .vhdx file format.

Update the Boot Menu to Add a VHD


To update a BIOS-based computer to include a Windows 8 boot menu


  1. Copy the .vhd or .vhdx file to the destination computer. For example, at a command prompt, type:
    copy N:\VHDs\windows.vhdx C:
  2. Use the DiskPart tool in Windows PE to attach the VHD on the destination computer. You can attach a VHD by using the Attach vdisk command. This enables the VHD so that it appears on the host as a disk drive instead of as a .vhd file. At a command prompt, type:
    diskpart
    select vdisk file=c:\windows.vhdx
    attach vdisk
    list volume
    select volume <volume_number_of_attached_VHD>
    assign letter=v
    exit
  3. Use the BCDboot tool, located in the \System32 directory of the VHD image or in Windows PE to copy the boot environment files and Boot Configuration Data (BCD) configuration from the \Windows directory in the VHD to the system partition. On a computer that has BIOS firmware, the system partition is the active partition of the first hard disk. For example, to use BCDboot from the VHD image, at a command prompt, type:
    cd v:\windows\system32
    bcdboot v:\windows

The BCDboot tool automatically imports information from the existing installation when updating the BCD. The computer is now updated to include a Windows 8 boot environment. You can now follow the steps in the section “To add a native-boot VHD to an existing Windows 8 boot menu” later in this topic.

To update a UEFI-based computer to include a Windows 8 boot menu


  1. Copy the .vhd or .vhdx file to the destination computer. For example, at a command prompt, type:
    copy N:\VHDs\windows.vhdx C:
  2. Use the DiskPart tool in Windows PE to attach the VHD on the destination computer. You can attach a VHD by using the Attach vdisk command. This enables the VHD so that it appears on the host as a disk drive instead of as a .vhdx file. At a command prompt, type:
    diskpart
    select vdisk file=C:\windows.vhdx
    attach vdisk
    list volume
    select volume <volume_number_of_attached_VHD>
    assign letter=v
    exit
  3. On a UEFI-based computer, the system partition is hidden by default and must be assigned a drive letter before you run the BCDboot tool. Use the DiskPart tool to locate the EFI system partition and assign a drive letter to it. At a command prompt, type:
    diskpart
    select disk 0
    list partition
    select partition <x>
    assign letter=s
    exit

    Where <x> is the 100 megabyte (MB) EFI system partition that is formatted with FAT.

  4. Use the BCDboot tool, located in the \System32 directory of the VHD image or in Windows PE to copy the boot environment files and BCD configuration from the \Windows directory in the VHD to the system partition. For example, to use BCDboot from the VHD image, at a command prompt, type:
    cd v:\windows\system32
    bcdboot v:\windows

The BCDboot tool automatically imports information from the existing installation when updating the BCD. The computer is now updated with a Windows 8 boot environment. You can now follow the steps to add a native-boot VHD to an existing Windows 8 boot menu.

To add a native-boot VHD to an existing Windows 8 boot menu


  1. Back up your BCD store using the BCDedit tool with the /export option. For example, at a command prompt, type:  bcdedit /export c:\bcdbackup
  2. Copy an existing boot entry for a Windows 8 installation. You will then modify the copy for use as the VHD boot entry. At a command prompt, type:
    bcdedit /copy {default} /d "vhd boot (locate)"

    When the BCDedit command is completed successfully, it returns a {GUID} as output in the Command Prompt window.

  3. Locate the {GUID} in the command-prompt output for the previous command. Copy the GUID, including the braces, to use in the following steps.
  4. Set the device and osdevice options for the VHD boot entry. At a command prompt, type:
    bcdedit /set {guid} device vhd=[locate]\windows.vhdx
    bcdedit /set {guid} osdevice vhd=[locate]\windows.vhdx
  5. Set the boot entry for the VHD as the default boot entry. When the computer restarts, the boot menu will display all of the Windows installations on the computer and boot into the VHD after the operating-system selection countdown is completed. At a command prompt, type:
    bcdedit /default {guid}
  6. Some x86-based systems require a boot configuration option for the kernel in order to detect certain hardware information and successfully native-boot from a VHD. At a command prompt, type:
    bcdedit /set {guid} detecthal on

For more information about how to use the BCDedit tool, see this Microsoft Web site.


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Working with #Microsoft products from 1985 and now a big year 2012 overview #WS2012 #sysctr #WindowsAzure #Cloud

1986 – 2011 hardware history I worked with

Microsoft Products History I Supported

Microsoft Hybrid Cloud Computing today with Windows Server 2012 and Windows 8 comming soon

 

Harware today OnPremise and  Microsoft DataCenter with the NEW Microsoft 2012 Products

The move to Cloud Services and Computing with Microsoft Windows Server 2012 and System Center 2012 products and Windows Azure is Great !

http://www.windowsazure.com/en-us/

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/server-cloud/windows-server/2012-default.aspx

http://blogs.technet.com/b/server-cloud/archive/tags/windows+server/

http://www.microsoftvirtualacademy.com/Home.aspx


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#Microsoft Windows Server “8” Beta and #SCVMM2012 Controle…….

The looks and feels for Controle in Windows Server “8” Beta are Much better in view and easy to use.

In one view you see that there is a Service problem on your Server.

Just Double Click on the Red Services and you see the problem :

This was a failed Services, only right click on the services to restart.

For trouble shooting and performance in Windows Server “8” Beta is all looking better :

You can filter on the processen by Selecting them, here you can see that for SCVMM2012 and SQL2012 Server.

Memory usage for applications and services looks like this :

Here you can see on the Windows Server “8” Beta Hypervisor, the memory usage of SCVMM Console but also of the VirtualMachine Viewer.

By Filtering you can see the Memory Usage of the Services of SCVMM2012 and SQL2012 Server.
The views and the controles are easy to use on Windows Server “8” Beta

 


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Microsoft #SQL2012 reporting for System Center 2012 SP1 CTP VMM on Windows “8” Beta #SCVMM2012 #Windows8

This topic is about reporting SQL 2012 for System Center 2012 SP1 CTP Virtual Machine Manager under Windows “8” Beta Server.

If you open Microsoft SQL 2012 Management Studio and go to the Virtual Machine Manager (VMM) database :

Here you can make the following standard reports by SQL 2012 Server about Virtual Machine Manager :

  • Disk Usage
  • Disk Usage by Top Tables
  • Disk Usage by Table
  • Disk Usage by Partition
  • Backup and Restore Events
  • All Transactions
  • All Blocking Transactions
  • Top Transactions by Age
  • Top Transactions by Blocked Transactions Count
  • Top Transactions by locks Count
  • Resource locking statistics by Objects
  • Obeject Execution Statistics
  • Database Consistency History
  • Index Usage Statistics
  • Index Physical Statistics
  • Schema Changes History
  • User Statistics

Here are some examples of the reports you can run with SQL 2012 Management Studio :

This is a report on the disk Usage of the VMM Database running on Windows “8” Server Beta with SQL 2012.

Here you see the User Statistics of System Center Virtual Machine Manager.

Here you see the Usage by Partion of the SQL DataBase of SCVMM.

When you don’t have Microsoft System Center Operations Manager installed, standard reporting of SQL 2012 Server is handy to use.
You can also make your Custom report in SQL 2012 for SCVMM DataBase.