mountainss Cloud and Datacenter Management Blog

Microsoft SystemCenter blogsite about virtualization on-premises and Cloud


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Protecting Enterprise workloads with #Cloud First #Azure Backup #Baas #RaaS

Azure Backup is the Azure-based service you can use to back up (or protect) and restore your data in the Microsoft cloud. Azure Backup replaces your existing on-premises or off-site backup solution with a cloud-based solution that is reliable, secure, and cost-competitive. Azure Backup offers multiple components that you download and deploy on the appropriate computer, server, or in the cloud. The component, or agent, that you deploy depends on what you want to protect. All Azure Backup components (no matter whether you’re protecting data on-premises or in the cloud) can be used to back up data to a Backup vault in Azure.
See the Azure Backup components table

Azure Backup’s cloud-first approach and why it matters by Principal Group Program Manager, Azure Backup Shreesh Dubey

Cloud-first value propositions

These are the benefits customers would likely expect in backup scenarios as they augment the public cloud to their IT infrastructure:

  1. Consistent management experience for Hybrid IT: Companies will be in a hybrid model where in addition to the on-premise IT, they will have a cloud foot print that has IaaS (“lift-and-shift applications”) that possibly extends to PaaS (“born-in-the-cloud applications”) and SaaS (O365). It is important to have a consistent experience to manage backups across the IT assets in this hybrid model.
  2. Agility: Business owners are seeking more agility offered by the public cloud where they can deploy solutions from the marketplace to meet their business needs. From a backup perspective, an application admin should be able to sign up for backup and do self-service restores without having to go through a central IT process to provision compute/storage in the cloud to enable backup.
  3. Reduce TCO (Total Cost of Ownership): A subscription based model (PAYG) is an obvious benefit of the public cloud, but it is also important to consider overall IT cost for backup. For example, if you need to deploy additional infrastructure in the cloud (compute and storage) for backups your overall costs would be higher.
  4. Freedom from infrastructure: This is one of the fundamental benefits companies seek when they move their IT to the cloud and since backup has a significant infrastructure footprint in on-premises IT (storage, compute, licenses, etc), an infrastructure-less backup solution would be a natural expectation for customers

Read and see more about Microsoft Azure Backup Cloud-First Approach

Here you can download the Microsoft Azure Backup Online documents converted into a PDF Format


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Get Started here with Microsoft log #Analytics for Hybrid Environment #MSOMS #Azure #HybridCloud #Sysctr

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Learn how to use Log Analytics in the Operations Management Suite to collect and analyze data generated by resources in your cloud and on-premises environments. Tutorials and other documentation show you how to get real-time insights across your workloads and servers regardless of physical location

Generate a PDF document about Log Analytics from Online documentation here

Proactive insights on workloads

  • Assess the risk and health of major workloads such as Active Directory and SQL.
  • View status of antimalware across your entire environment
  • Identify missing system updates across Windows and Linux servers
  • Detect potential configuration issues or deviations from identified best practices
  • Create alerts, alert rules, and notification timeframes

Rich data visualization

  • Analyze petabytes of data from the cloud with unlimited data retention
  • Chart and compare complex statistical functions
  • Use View Designer to create your own visualization of data queries
  • Send datasets to Power BI for enhanced visualization capabilities

Visibility across clouds and platforms

  • Connect to Linux and Windows virtual machines with one click
  • Ingest data from System Center, Zabbix, and Nagios
  • Collect any type of data through custom log collection
  • Securely send log data through proxy server and OMS Gateway

 

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Hybrid IT Connect computers and devices to #MSOMS using the OMS Gateway #Winserv #Linux

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Instead of each individual agent sending data directly to OMS and requiring a direct Internet connection, all agent data is instead sent through a single computer that has an Internet connection. That computer is where you install and use the gateway. In this scenario, you can install agents on any computers where you want to collect data. The gateway then transfers data from the agents to OMS directly.

Here you can start with downloading the software for Microsoft OMS Gateway

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I used the default port 8080 for the Gateway.

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Now the Microsoft OMS Gateway Services is installedoms-gateway-running

Now Microsoft Operations Management Suite Gateway is installed, you can use some Microsoft Powershell Commands :

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After the installation of the OMS Gateway, I installed the OMS Agent :

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Download your OMS Agent here

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Copy => Paste your OMS Workspace ID and Key.

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Here you can see the OMS Agent Connection settings.

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When you wait for a few minutes you will see the connection in the Portal of OMS.

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After this I installed the OMS Agent on One of my Domain Controllers with OMS Gateway settings //HyperV2016.hybridcloud4you.nl:8080.

This is what you will see in the Event Viewer of the OMS Gateway Server :

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Domain Controller 192.168.2.100 is going via the OMS Gateway

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OMS Agent via the Microsoft OMS Gateway

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From here you can start with your OMS Solutions 😉

It is also possible to connect your System Center Operations Manager (SCOM) on-premises to the OMS Gateway.
Then you don’t have to connect your SCOM Management Server directly to the internet to OMS.

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Free #Microsoft Architecting #HybridCloud Environments whitepaper #Azure #Sysctr #Hyperv

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Hybrid cloud environments combine traditional on-premises IT with the consumption of cloud-based capacity (IaaS) and other cloud-based services. When carefully planned and executed, hybrid cloud models can deliver much of the best of both on-premises and cloud services. This paper focuses on understanding the different design approaches for architecting hybrid cloud environments, using technologies available from Microsoft, Microsoft Partner Solutions, and the Open Source community. Its objective is to enable IT architects to develop the right infrastructure strategies to deliver more of the potential promised by hybrid cloud-enabled scenarios.

Here you can download the Microsoft Architecting Hybrid cloud environments Whitepaper

On-Premises to Azure

On-premises to Microsoft Azure.


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#Microsoft Azure Backup D2D and for Longtime Protection D2D2C #HybridCloud #Backup #Azure #Sysctr

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Microsoft Azure Backup Vault Services

With Microsoft Azure Backup, you can protect application workloads such as Hyper-V VMs, Microsoft SQL Server, SharePoint Server, Microsoft Exchange and Windows clients to:
– Disk (D2D), giving high RTOs for tier 1 workloads
– Azure (D2D2C) for long term retention.
And, you can manage the protection of various protected entities (servers and clients) from a single on-premises user interface.

You can deploy Microsoft Azure Backup server as:
– A physical standalone server.
– A Hyper-V virtual machine – You can run DPM as a virtual machine hosted on an on-premises Hyper-V host server, to back up on-premises data.
– A Windows virtual machine in VMWare – You can deploy DPM to provide protection for Microsoft workloads running on Windows virtual machines in VMWare. In this scenario DPM can be deployed as a physical standalone server, as a Hyper-V virtual machine, or as a Windows virtual machine in VMWare.
– An Azure virtual machine – You can run DPM as a virtual machine in Azure to back up cloud workloads running as Azure virtual machines.

Here you can download Microsoft Azure Backup

HybridCloud DPM

Microsoft Azure Backup Documentation


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Set up protection between on-premises #VMware virtual machines or physical servers and #Azure #HybridCloud

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Azure Site Recovery contributes to your business continuity and disaster recovery (BCDR) strategy by orchestrating replication, failover and recovery of virtual machines and physical servers. Read about possible deployment scenarios in the Azure Site Recovery overview.

This walkthrough describes how to deploy Site Recovery to:

  • Protect on-premises VMware virtual machines to Azure
  • Protect on-premises physical Windows and Linux servers to Azure

Business advantages include:

  • Protection of physical Windows or Linux servers.
  • Simple replication, failover, and recovery using the Azure Site Recovery portal.
  • Data replication over the Internet, a site-to-site VPN connection, or over Azure ExpressRoute.
  • Failback (restore) from Azure to an on-premises VMware infrastructure.
  • Simplified discovery of VMware virtual machines.
  • Multi VM consistency so that virtual machines and physical servers running specific workloads can be recovered together to a consistent data point.
  • Recovery plans for simplified failover and recovery of workloads tiered over multiple machines.

Deployment components

  • On-premises machines—Your on-premises site has machines that you want to protect. These are either virtual machines running on a VMware hypervisor, or physical servers running Windows or Linux.
  • On-premises process server—Protected machines send replication data to the on-premises process server. The process server performs a number of actions on that data. It optimizes it before sending it on to the master target server in Azure. It has a disk-based cache to cache replication data that it receives. It also handles push installation of the Mobility Service which must be installed on each virtual machine or physical server you want to protect, and performs automatic discovery of VMware vCenter servers. The process server is a virtual or physical server running Windows Server 2012 R2. We recommend it’s placed on the same network and LAN segment as the machines that you want to protect, but it can run on a different network as long as protected machines have L3 network visibility to it. During deploy you’ll set up the process server and register it to the configuration server.
  • Azure Site Recovery vault—The vault coordinates and orchestrates data replica, failover, and recovery between your on-premises site and Azure.
  • Azure configuration server—The configuration server coordinates communication between protected machines, the process server, and master target servers in Azure. It sets up replication and coordinates recovery in Azure when failover occurs. The configuration server runs on an Azure Standard A3 virtual machine in your Azure subscription. During deployment you’ll set up the server and register it to the Azure Site Recovery vault.
  • Master target server—The master target server in Azure holds replicated data from your protected machines using attached VHDs created on blob storage in your Azure storage account. You deploy it as an Azure virtual machine as a Windows server based on a Windows Server 2012 R2 gallery image (to protect Windows machines) or as a Linux server based on a OpenLogic CentOS 6.6 gallery image (to protect Linux machines). Two sizing options are available – standard A3 and standard D14. The server is connected to the same Azure network as the configuration server. During deployment you’ll create the server and register it to the configuration server.
  • Mobility service—You install the Mobility service on each VMware virtual machine or Windows/Linux physical server that you want to protect. The service sends replication data to the process server, which in turn sends it to the master target server in Azure. The process server can automatically install the Mobility service on protected machines, or you can deploy the service manually using your internal software deployment process.
  • Data communication and replication channel—There are a couple of options. Note that neither option requires you to open any inbound network ports on protected machines. All network communication is initiated from the on-premises site.
    • Over the Internet—Communicates and replicates data from protected on-premises servers and Azure over a secure public internet connection. This is the default option.
    • VPN/ExpressRoute—Communicates and replicates data between on-premises servers and Azure over a VPN connection. You’ll need to set up a site-to-site VPN or an ExpressRoute connection between the on-premises site and your Azure network.

Here you find the Microsoft Step-by-Step blogpost to Set up protection between on-premises VMware virtual machines or physical servers and Azure


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UPDATE Microsoft Virtual Machine Converter 3.0 #SCVMM #Azure #Hyperv #VMware

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Microsoft Virtual Machine Converter (MVMC) is a Microsoft-supported, stand-alone solution for the information technology (IT) pro or solution provider who wants to convert virtual machines and disks from VMware hosts to Hyper-V hosts and Microsoft Azure or alternatively convert a physical computer running Windows Server 2008 or above server operating systems or Windows Vista or above client operating systems to a virtual machine running on Hyper-V host

MVMC can be deployed with minimal dependencies. Because MVMC provides native support for Windows PowerShell, it enables scripting and integration with data center automation workflows such as those authored and run within Microsoft System Center Orchestrator 2012 R2. It can also be invoked through the Windows PowerShell command-line interface. The solution is simple to download, install, and use. In addition to the Windows PowerShell capability, MVMC provides a wizard-driven GUI to facilitate virtual machine conversion.

New Features in MVMC 3.0
The 3.0 release of MVMC adds the ability to convert a physical computer running Windows Server 2008 or above server operating systems or Windows Vista or above client operating systems to a virtual machine running on Hyper-V host.

Standard Features
•Converts virtual disks that are attached to a VMware virtual machine to virtual hard disks (VHDs) that can be uploaded to Microsoft Azure.
•Provides native Windows PowerShell capability that enables scripting and integration into IT automation workflows.
Note The command-line interface (CLI) in MVMC 1.0 has been replaced by Windows PowerShell in MVMC 2.0.
•Supports conversion and provisioning of Linux-based guest operating systems from VMware hosts to Hyper-V hosts.
•Supports conversion of offline virtual machines.
•Supports the new virtual hard disk format (VHDX) when converting and provisioning in Hyper-V in Windows Server 2012 R2 and Windows Server 2012.
•Supports conversion of virtual machines from VMware vSphere 5.5, VMware vSphere 5.1, and VMware vSphere 4.1 hosts Hyper-V virtual machines.
•Supports Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows Server 2012, and Windows 8 as guest operating systems that you can select for conversion.
•Converts and deploys virtual machines from VMware hosts to Hyper-V hosts on any of the following operating systems:
•Windows Server 2012 R2
•Windows Server 2012
•Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1
•Converts VMware virtual machines, virtual disks, and configurations for memory, virtual processor, and other virtual computing resources from the source to Hyper-V.
•Adds virtual network interface cards (NICs) to the converted virtual machine on Hyper-V.
•Supports conversion of virtual machines from VMware vSphere 5.5, VMware vSphere 5.0, and VMware vSphere 4.1 hosts to Hyper-V.
•Has a wizard-driven GUI, which simplifies performing virtual machine conversions.
•Uninstalls VMware Tools before online conversion (online only) to provide a clean way to migrate VMware-based virtual machines to Hyper-V.
Important MVMC takes a snapshot of the virtual machine that you are converting before you uninstall VMware Tools, and then shuts down the source machine to preserve state during conversion. The virtual machine is restored to its previous state after the source disks that are attached to the virtual machine are successfully copied to the machine where the conversion process is run. At that point, the source machine in VMware can be turned on, if required.
Important MVMC does not uninstall VMware Tools in an offline conversion. Instead, it disables VMware services, drivers, and programs only for Windows Server guest operating systems. For file conversions with Linux guest operating systems, VMware Tools are not disabled or uninstalled. We highly recommend that you manually uninstall VMware Tools when you convert an offline virtual machine.
•Supports Windows Server and Linux guest operating system conversion. For more details, see the section “Supported Configurations for Virtual Machine Conversion” in this guide.
•Includes Windows PowerShell capability for offline conversions of VMware-based virtual hard disks (VMDK) to a Hyper-V–based virtual hard disk file format (.vhd file).
Note The offline disk conversion does not include driver fixes.

You can download the Microsoft Virtual Machine Converter 3.0 and documentation here