mountainss Cloud and Datacenter Management Blog

Microsoft SystemCenter blogsite about virtualization on-premises and Cloud


Leave a comment

Subscribe for Free on #Microsoft @MSFTMechanics for Awesome Tech Videos #Azure #MSOMS and More

Subscribe to Microsoft Mechanics on YouTube to keep you up-to-date of the latest Microsoft Technologies 😉
You can follow them also on Twitter @MSFTMechanics 

Advertisements


Leave a comment

Learn #JSON with Microsoft #Azure Resource Manager and Visual Studio #Code for #AzureStack #Cloud

consistent-management-layer

The infrastructure for your application is typically made up of many components – maybe a virtual machine, storage account, and virtual network, or a web app, database, database server, and 3rd party services. You do not see these components as separate entities, instead you see them as related and interdependent parts of a single entity. You want to deploy, manage, and monitor them as a group. Azure Resource Manager enables you to work with the resources in your solution as a group. You can deploy, update, or delete all the resources for your solution in a single, coordinated operation. You use a template for deployment and that template can work for different environments such as testing, staging, and production. Resource Manager provides security, auditing, and tagging features to help you manage your resources after deployment.

The benefits of using Resource Manager

Resource Manager provides several benefits:

  • You can deploy, manage, and monitor all the resources for your solution as a group, rather than handling these resources individually.
  • You can repeatedly deploy your solution throughout the development lifecycle and have confidence your resources are deployed in a consistent state.
  • You can manage your infrastructure through declarative templates rather than scripts.
  • You can define the dependencies between resources so they are deployed in the correct order.
  • You can apply access control to all services in your resource group because Role-Based Access Control (RBAC) is natively integrated into the management platform.
  • You can apply tags to resources to logically organize all the resources in your subscription.
  • You can clarify your organization’s billing by viewing costs for a group of resources sharing the same tag.

Resource Manager provides a new way to deploy and manage your solutions. If you used the earlier deployment model and want to learn about the changes, see Understanding Resource Manager deployment and classic deployment.

Here you find the Microsoft Azure Resource Manager Overview documentation

Working with Azure Resource Manager Templates in Visual Studio Code :

Azure Resource Manager templates are JSON files that describe a resource and related dependencies. These files can sometimes be large and complicated so tooling support is important. Visual Studio Code is a new, lightweight, open-source, cross-platform code editor. It supports creating and editing Resource Manager templates through a new extension. VS Code runs everywhere and doesn’t require Internet access unless you also want to deploy your Resource Manager templates.

If you do not already have VS Code, you can install it at https://code.visualstudio.com/.

Working with Azure Resource Manager and Visual Studio Code start here

What I really like is ARMVIZ, this is a visualizer of your JSON templates and here you can learn more about making JSON templates for your Solutions.

armviz-design

arm-json

Get Started today and build your Own JSON Templates for Microsoft Azure or Azure Stack Cloud solutions.

github-logo


Leave a comment

Microsoft #AzureStack Technical Preview 2 Available at #MSIgnite 2016 Event

azurestack-leveranciers

AzureStack on Lenovo, HP and Dell at MS Ignite

architecture-azurestack

Microsoft AzureStack Architecture

Microsoft Azure Stack POC architecture

Microsoft Azure Stack is a new hybrid cloud platform product that lets you deliver Azure services from your organization’s datacenter. Microsoft Azure Stack Technical Preview 2 is being made available through a Proof of Concept (POC). The POC is an environment for learning and demonstrating Azure Stack features. It lets you deploy all required components on a single physical machine to create an environment for evaluating key concepts and capabilities, and validating the extensibility model for APIs.

Azure Stack deployment prerequisites

Before you deploy Azure Stack POC (Proof of Concept), make sure your computer meets the following requirements. The Technical Preview 2 deployment requirements for the POC are the same as those required for Technical Preview 1. Therefore, you can use the same hardware that you used for the previous single-box preview.

 make sure you have the right hardware configuration with this Script

This standalone script goes through the pre-requisites checks done by the setup for Azure Stack Technical Preview 2 (TP2). It provides a way to confirm you are meeting the hardware and software requirements, before downloading the larger package for Azure Stack TP2

Here you can download Microsoft Azure Stack TP2

Build and deploy your application the same way whether it runs on Azure or Azure Stack. Use Azure Resource Manager to build reusable application templates for both traditional and cloud-native apps. Use role-based access control in Azure Resource Manager and Azure Active Directory to enable fine-grained access to application resources. Write to the same Azure APIs. Use the same Azure SDK. With Active Directory Federation Services supported, you can authenticate your apps to Azure Active Directory or your on-premises Active Directory. Continue to use Visual Studio as your development canvas. Or use PowerShell to deploy if that’s what you prefer. Just like Azure, you get a broad choice of open source technologies including Linux, Java, Node.js, and PHP.

Download the Azure SDKs

Read a whitepaper on Azure Resource Manager

What’s new in Azure Stack Technical Preview 2

 

azurestack-rack

Start with your AzureStack TP2 POC 😉


Leave a comment

Free EBook Fundamentals of #Azure Second Edition #Cloud

ebook-azure-fundamentals-second

Microsoft Azure Essentials: Fundamentals of Azure, Second Edition

Michael S. Collier and Robin E. Shahan

The “Microsoft Azure Essentials” series helps you advance your technical skills with Microsoft Azure. This book covers the fundamentals of Azure you need to start developing solutions right away. It concentrates on the features of the Azure platform that you are most likely to need to know rather than on every feature and service available on the platform. This book also provides several walkthroughs you can follow to learn how to create VMs and virtual networks, websites and storage accounts, and so on. In many cases, real-world tips are included to help you get the most out of your Azure experience. In addition to its coverage of core Azure services, the book discusses common tools useful in creating and managing Azure-based solutions

SCUG Banner


Leave a comment

Video Use of #VisualStudio and #PowerShell to create #Azure Policy is now GA

Azure Resource Manager now allows you to control access through custom policies. With policies, you can prevent users in your organization from breaking conventions that are needed to manage your organization’s resources. You create policy definitions that describe the actions or resources that are specifically denied. You assign those policy definitions at the desired scope, such as the subscription, resource group, or an individual resource.

Microsoft is Announcing Azure Resource Policy general availability here

Microsoft Azure Banner


Leave a comment

Hybrid Infrastructure #Automation with Azure Resource Manager Templates #Azure #AzureStack #ARM #DSC

If you’ve ever had to set up a test or production environment for something like SharePoint, you know there are several pieces to set up – like Active Directory, SQL for your backend data, and then your SharePoint servers. While it’s possible to automate this with advanced scripting or level 400 task sequencer skills, imagine just choosing a template or manifest file and clicking go to spin up a dozen or so VMs all wired together and talking to each other. That is effectively what Azure Resource Manager templates do and what Corey Sanders lead engineer for Azure compute, demonstrates on the show. He also steps back to illustrate how they work as a unified resource automation model for both Microsoft Azure Cloud resources and on premises with the upcoming Azure Stack.

Microsoft Datacenter vNext Preview: Bringing Azure to Your Datacenter (MVA Learning)

Cloud Applications

ARM


Leave a comment

On #GitHub Azure Resource Visualizer #ARM #JSON #Azure #AzureStack

Azure Resource Visualizer

A visual way of visualizing, editing, and saving Azure Resource Manager Templates

To understand and learn more about Azure Resource Manager and JSON Scripting go to GitHub Azure Resources Visualizer

Here you go to the Azure Resource Visualizer