mountainss Cloud and Datacenter Management Blog

Microsoft SystemCenter blogsite about virtualization on-premises and Cloud

Leave a comment

Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) with Microsoft #Azure #Cloud #AzureStack #HybridCloud

Break down video of the essentials needed to plan and implement your solutions on Microsoft Azure IaaS. This 7-minute intro covers compute, virtual machines, containers, networking, storage and management options in Microsoft Azure.

When you transform your datacenter on-premises to Microsoft Azure Cloud Service, these Architecture references can help you
to make the right chooses for your business needs. The Azure Architecture Center contains guidance for building end-to-end solutions on Microsoft Azure. Here you will find reference architectures, best practices, design patterns, scenario guides, and reference implementations.

Start here for your Microsoft Azure Architecture designs

Microsoft Azure Architecture Center

On the left site of this page you can download the complete content of Microsoft Azure Architecture Center into a PDF file 😉
Looks like this :

When your transition and your Architecture is done on Paper you can move save to Microsoft Azure Cloud Services.

Accelerate your digital transformation:
Now is the time to move to Azure and reap the rewards of cloud technology, including the ability to scale up or down quickly, pay only for what you use, and save on compute power. Whether you are deploying new virtual machines, moving a few workloads, or migrating your datacenters as part of your hybrid cloud strategy, the Azure Hybrid Benefit provides big savings as you move to the cloud.

Have a look at the Microsoft Azure Hybrid Use Benefit

Here you find some handy links to Microsoft Azure Cloud Services :

Microsoft Azure Products Technical docs

Microsoft Azure SDK and Tools

Getting started with Microsoft Azure products

Microsoft Azure Resources

Here you find the Whitepaper of Azure Virtual Datacenter Lift and Shift Guide but also an E-book of Azure Virtual Datacenter from the Azure CAT Guidance Team which can help you to start your transition of your datacenter to the Microsoft Azure Cloud.


Microsoft Mechanics all Azure

When you have workloads in your on-premises Datacenter which may not run in any public Cloud or via Internet, you can run Microsoft Azure in your Datacenter via Microsoft Azure Stack.

Build modern applications across hybrid cloud environments

Azure Stack is an extension of Azure, bringing the agility and fast-paced innovation of cloud computing to on-premises environments. Only Azure Stack lets you deliver Azure services from your organization’s datacenter, while balancing the right amount of flexibility and control—for truly-consistent hybrid cloud deployments.

Microsoft Azure Stack Overview

Hope this blogpost will help you out with your journey to the Microsoft Azure Cloud.


Leave a comment

#Microsoft Global MVP Summit 2018 was Awesome #MVPbuzz #MVPSummit

The Microsoft 25th Global MVP Summit 2018 was just AWESOME !

I like to Thank you all the people at Microsoft who was helping at the Global MVP Summit 2018 and made this Great Event to a big Success.
I had a Great time with the Microsoft Product teams and PM’s, with Good interactive sessions and Awesome NDA content. I Love to be an MVP in Cloud and Datacenter Management and learning a lot about Microsoft Azure, AzureStack, Analytics, in a DevOps way on Microsoft HQ Campus. First in Building 92 and later in Building 33.
Thank you Tina StenderupLarsen for being on the Summit for all your MVP’s and organize everything !


Leave a comment

What is New in Microsoft System Center version 1801 #Sysctr #SCOM #SCVMM #SCDPM

What is New in Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager version 1801 ?

  • Nested virtualization
  • Migration of VMware VM (EFI firmware-based VM) to Hyper-V VM
  • Performance improvement in host refresher
  • Enhanced console session in VMM

Networking :

Security :

Azure Integration :

SCVMM 1801 supports management of ARM-based VMs, Azure Active Directory (AD) based authentication that is created by using the new Azure portal and region-specific Azure subscriptions (namely, Germany, China, US Government Azure regions).

Download here System Center Virtual Machine Manager version 1801 VHD

What is New in System Center Data Protection Manager version 1801 ?

The following features are either new to DPM, or are improved for DPM 2016.

Modern Backup Storage – Using Resilient File System (ReFS) block-cloning technology to store incremental backups, DPM 2016 dramatically improves storage utilization and performance. The storage consumed by backups grows and shrinks with the production data source, and there is no over-allocation of storage.
Resilient change tracking (RCT) – DPM uses RCT (the native change tracking in Hyper-V), which removes the need for time-consuming consistency checks. RCT provides better resiliency than the change tracking provided by VSS snapshot-based backups. DPM also uses RCT for incremental backup. It identifies VHD changes for virtual machines, and transfers only those blocks that are indicated by the change tracker.
Continued protection during cluster aware updates – Windows Server 2016 comes with the cluster OS rolling update, where a cluster can be upgraded to Windows Server 2016 without bringing it down. DPM 2016 continues to protect VMs during the upgrade, maintaining the backup service level agreement (SLA).
Shielded VM Backups – Shielded VMs in Windows Server 2016 help protect sensitive VMs from inspection, tampering, and data theft by malware and malicious administrators. DPM 2016 backups retain the protections provided by shielded VMs to ensure they can be recovered seamlessly and securely.
Hyper-V with Storage Spaces Direct – DPM recognizes and protects Hyper-V VMs deployed on Storage Spaces Direct, delivering seamless backup and recovery of VMs in disaggregated and hyper-converged scenarios.
Hyper-V with ReFS SOFS Cluster – DPM 2016 can back up Hyper-V VMs deployed on ReFS-based SOFS clusters. Backup and recovery of RCT-based VMs and non-RCT VMs is supported.
Upgrading a DPM production server to 2016 doesn’t require a reboot – When you upgrade to DPM 2016, you are not required to reboot the production server. To avoid rebooting the production server, upgrade to DPM 2016 and upgrade the DPM agent on the production servers. Backups continue and you reboot the production server when you want.

DPM to Azure Backup Vault.

Download here System Center Data Protection Manager version 1801 VHD

What is New in System Center Operations Manager version 1801 ?

  • Enter product key from the Operation Console
  • Linux monitoring
  • Improved HTML5 dashboarding experience
  • System Center Visual Studio Authoring Extension (VSAE) support for Visual Studio 2017
  • Enhanced SDK Client performance
  • Updates and recommendations for third-party Management Packs
  • Linux Kerberos support
  • Service Map integration

Microsoft Service Map automatically discovers application components on Windows and Linux systems and maps the communication between services. It automatically builds a common reference map of dependencies across your servers, processes, and third-party services. Integration between Service Map and System Center Operations Manager allows you to automatically create distributed application diagrams in Operations Manager that are based on the dynamic dependency maps in Service Map.

The Microsoft System Center Operations Manager Team published a great blogpost on the New SCOM Web Console version 1801

Download here System Center Operations Manager version 1801 VHD

Download here System Center Orchestrator version 1801 VHD

Download here System Center Service Manager version 1801 VHD


Here you find more information about System Center version 1801

Test today the new features of System Center version 1801 with the Evaluation VHD’s 😉

Leave a comment

Designing, building, and operating #Microservices on #Azure with #Kubernetes Guide

In this set of articles, Microsoft explores how to build and run a Microservices Architecture on Azure, using Kubernetes as a container orchestrator. Topics include:

  • Using Domain Driven Design (DDD) to design a microservices architecture.
  • Choosing the right Azure technologies for compute, storage, messaging, and other elements of the design.
  • Understanding microservices design patterns.
  • Designing for resliency, scalability, and performance.
  • Building a CI/CD pipeline.

Read all the information on Microservices on Azure here


Leave a comment

Registration is open for #Microsoft Tech Summit Amsterdam 2018 #Azure #Cloud #MSTechSummit

Build your cloud skills
Free technical learning event with Microsoft’s top cloud engineers across Azure and Microsoft 365. Whether you’re developing innovative apps or delivering optimized solutions, Microsoft Tech Summit can help evolve your skills, deepen your expertise, and grow your career.

Customize your learning
Whether you’re already cloud-savvy or just getting started, there is something for everyone. Discover the latest trends, tools, and product roadmaps at more than 80 sessions covering a range of focus areas and topics – from keynotes and breakouts to hands-on labs.

Connect with experts
Take advantage of the event Hub, a gathering place where you can learn, network, meet partners, visit the community theater, and more! You’ll also have access to experts who can help you get the most out of the cloud – ask your toughest questions, share best practices, and provide feedback.

Get inspired
The cloud is changing expectations – and transforming the way we live and work. Learn how Microsoft’s cloud platform can help you lead your organization through real digital transformation – and shape your future.

Build your cloud skills with the latest in Azure and Microsoft 365 at a free, technical learning event for IT professionals and developers.
March 28-29, 2018
Register here

Here you find the Microsoft Tech Summit 2018 Catalog sessions

See you at this Awesome Microsoft Tech Summit Event in Amsterdam 😉 #MVPbuzz

Leave a comment

#Microsoft Azure Virtual Datacenter Guidance Whitepaper Available #Cloud #Security #Azure

Overview Azure Virtual Datacenter is an approach to making the most of the Azure cloud platform’s capabilities while respecting your existing security and networking policies. When deploying enterprise workloads to the cloud, IT organizations and business units must balance governance with developer agility. Azure Virtual Datacenter provides models to achieve this balance with an emphasis on governance. Deploying workloads to the cloud introduces the need to develop and maintain trust in the cloud to the same degree you trust your existing datacenters. The first model of Azure Virtual Datacenter guidance is designed to bridge that need through a locked-down approach to virtual infrastructures. This approach isn’t for everyone. It’s specifically designed to guide enterprise IT groups in extending their on-premises infrastructure to the Azure public cloud. We call this approach the trusted datacenter extension model. Over time, several other models will be offered, including those that allow secure Internet access directly from a virtual datacenter.

In the Azure Virtual Datacenter model, you can apply isolation policies, make the cloud more like the physical datacenters you know, and achieve the levels of security and trust you need. Four components any enterprise IT team would recognize make it possible: software-defined networking, encryption, identity management, and the Azure platform’s underlying compliance standards and certifications. These four are key to making a virtual datacenter a trusted extension of your existing infrastructure investment. Central to this model is the idea that your cloud infrastructure has isolation boundaries that can be thought of as your corporate namespace. Think of it as your isolated cloud within Azure. Within this virtual boundary, security controls, network policies, and compliance come together, providing you with an IT infrastructure on Azure capable of securely integrating cloud resources with your existing on-premises datacenter. You can deploy new virtual workspaces in the virtual datacenter much as you would deploy additional capacity to your physical datacenter. These virtual workspaces are self-contained

Environments where workloads can run independently, and workload teams can get workspace specific access. Workspaces enable teams to build solutions and manage workloads with great freedom while adhering to the overall access and security policies defined in the central IT infrastructure. This guide is intended for enterprise IT architects and executives. Using the lens of the physical datacenter, the guide discusses an approach to designing secure, trusted virtual datacenters on the Azure platform. Azure Virtual Datacenter is not a specific product or service but rather a way to think about cloud infrastructures. It offers proven practices and guidance to help smooth your migration to the cloud. At the end of this guide, you can learn about the upcoming Virtual Datacenter Automation guidance. This guidance includes a collection of scripts and Azure Resource Manager templates that will help you build an Azure Virtual Datacenter using the trusted extension model.

You can download this Awesome Microsoft whitepaper Azure Virtual Datacenter here

Leave a comment

Microsoft Azure #CloudShell Overview with #Bash CLI 2.0 and #Powershell #Azure #DevOps

Azure Powershell in the Portal

Azure Cloud Shell is an interactive, browser-accessible shell for managing Azure resources. It gives you the flexibility of choosing the shell experience that best suits the way you work. Linux users can opt for a Bash experience, while Windows users can opt for PowerShell.

At the left corner you can change from Powershell Cmd to Bash

Bash with Azure CLI 2.0 

Browser-based shell experience
Cloud Shell enables access to a browser-based command-line experience built with Azure management tasks in mind. Leverage Cloud Shell to work untethered from a local machine in a way only the cloud can provide.

Choice of preferred shell experience
Azure Cloud Shell gives you the flexibility of choosing the shell experience that best suits the way you work. Linux users can opt for a Bash experience, while Windows users can opt for PowerShell.

Pre-configured Azure workstation
Cloud Shell comes pre-installed with popular command-line tools and language support so you can work faster.

View the full tooling list for Bash experience and PowerShell experience.

Automatic authentication
Cloud Shell securely authenticates automatically on each session for instant access to your resources through the Azure CLI 2.0 or Azure PowerShell cmdlets.

Connect your Azure File storage
Cloud Shell machines are temporary and as a result require an Azure Files share to be mounted as clouddrive to persist your $Home directory. On first launch Cloud Shell prompts to create a resource group, storage account, and file share on your behalf. This is a one-time step and will be automatically attached for all sessions. A single file share can be mapped and will be used by both Bash and PowerShell in Cloud Shell.

I like Microsoft Azure CLI 2.0 in the Cloud Shell and here you find a CLI 2.0 command line reference guide.

In the following step-by-step examples ( in Bash and Powershell ) you will see how easy it is to make an Azure Container Instance in the Cloud.
we begin with starting Bash Shell from the Azure Portal.

When you run Cloud Shell for the first time it will create a Cloud Drive of 5GB.

Cloud Shell machines are temporary and as a result require an Azure Files share to be mounted as clouddrive to persist your $Home directory. On first launch Cloud Shell prompts to create a resource group, storage account, and file share on your behalf. This is a one-time step and will be automatically attached for all sessions. A single file share can be mapped and will be used by both Bash and PowerShell in Cloud Shell.

Create Storage for your CloudDrive

A locally-redundant storage (LRS) account and Azure Files share can be created on your behalf. The Azure Files share will be used for both Bash and PowerShell environments if you choose to use both. Regular storage costs apply.

  • Cloud Shell runs on a temporary machine provided on a per-session, per-user basis
  • Cloud Shell times out after 20 minutes without interactive activity
  • Cloud Shell can only be accessed with a file share attached
  • Cloud Shell uses a the same file share for both Bash and PowerShell
  • Cloud Shell is assigned one machine per user account
  • Permissions are set as a regular Linux user (Bash)

az container create -h

With this command you see the options to create a Container Instance in Microsoft Azure Cloud.

You see also some examples to learn from

az group create –name MyResourceGroup –location eastus

We now created a resource group in the East US location of Azure for our Container.

az container create –name mycontainer –image microsoft/aci-helloworld –resource-group MyResourceGroup –ip-address public

We now Created an Azure Container Instance.

ProvisioningState Succeeded

az container list –output table

The result of your Azure Container Instance

To see how your Azure Container Instance is doing, you can read the logs.

az container logs –name mycontainer –resource-group MyResourceGroup

When your Azure Container Instance was for testing, you can delete the instance by :

az container delete –name mycontainer  –resource-group MyResourceGroup

az container list –output table

I got two Azure Container Instances running, and now you can see that mycontainer instance is deleted.
This was just an simple example by using Bash in the Azure Portal with CLI 2.0 commands. Of course there are a lot of Azure Solutions to play with:

In the following step-by-step example we will use Azure Powershell from the portal instead of Bash :


Microsoft Azure Powershell via the Portal is using version 5.1 Build 14393 Revision 1480 in my example.
Of course there is also an Azure Powershell reference guide online

New-AzureRmResourceGroup -Name MyResourceGroup -Location EastUS

We now have created the Resource Group with Azure Powershell for the Container Instance.

New-AzureRmContainerGroup -ResourceGroupName MyResourceGroup -name mycontainer -image microsoft/iis:nanoserver -OsType Windows -IpAddressType Public

Get-AzureRmContainerGroup -ResourceGroupName MyResourceGroup -Name mycontainer

You will see that the New Azure Container Instance is provisioned.


And the IIS is running in the Azure Container Instance.

Of course you don’t have your laptop always with you, but Microsoft Azure has an Awesome Mobile App to work with.


Mobile Azure Powershell via the App

Mobile Azure Bash via the App

Here you can get the Microsoft Azure Mobile App

Here are some handy links to use with Microsoft Azure Cloud Shell :

Deploy resources with Resource Manager templates and Azure CLI

Deploy resources with Resource Manager templates and Azure PowerShell

Overview of Azure Cloud Shell (Preview)

Microsoft Azure Cloud Roadmap