mountainss Cloud and Datacenter Management Blog

Microsoft SystemCenter blogsite about virtualization on-premises and Cloud


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Deploying Containers on #Kubernetes Cluster in #Docker for Windows CE and on #Azure AKS

Kubernetes Custer via Docker for Windows CE Edge

Docker CE for Windows is Docker designed to run on Windows 10. It is a native Windows application that provides an easy-to-use development environment for building, shipping, and running dockerized apps. Docker CE for Windows uses Windows-native Hyper-V virtualization and networking and is the fastest and most reliable way to develop Docker apps on Windows. Docker CE for Windows supports running both Linux and Windows Docker containers.
Download Docker for Windows Community Edition Edge here

From Docker for Windows version 18.02 CE Edge includes a standalone Kubernetes server and client, as well as Docker CLI integration. The Kubernetes server runs locally within your Docker instance, is not configurable, and is a single-node cluster.

I’m using Docker for Windows CE version 18.05.0

Now your Single node Kubernetes Cluster is running.

To get the Kubernetes Dashboard you have to install it with Kubectl :

kubectl create -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/kubernetes/dashboard/master/src/deploy/recommended/kubernetes-dashboard.yaml

Run kubectl proxy

Keep this running.

Go with your browser to : http://localhost:8001/api/v1/namespaces/kube-system/services/https:kubernetes-dashboard:/proxy/#!/login  and you can skip kubeconfig for now.

You are now in the Kubernetes Dashboard.

Now it’s time to make your first containers (Pods) on Kubernetes.
Click on +CREATE in the upper right corner.

For example code I used a yaml script to deploy Nginx with 3 replicas

Deploying the Nginx Containers (Pods)

Nginx is running on Kubernetes.

With Microsoft Visual Studio Code and the Kubernetes extension you can play with Nginx Containers (pods) locally on your laptop.

When you need more capacity and want to scale-up with more Containers (Pods) for your solution, you can use Microsoft Azure Cloud with Azure Kubernetes Services

Monitor Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) with container health (Preview) and with Analytics

 

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Deploy #Azure WebApp with Visual Studio Code and Play with #Kudu and App Service Editor and #VSC

When you have installed Microsoft Visual Studio Code which is Free and Open Source with Git integration, Debugging and lot of Extensions available,
You activate the Microsoft Azure App Service extension in VSC.

Azure App Service Extension

You can install really easy more Azure Extensions here.

On the Left you will see your Azure Subscription and by pushing the + you will create a new Azure WebApp.

Enter the name of the Resource Group

Select your OS Windows or Linux

Add the Name of the New App Service Plan

Choose a App Service plan See more information here

Select Azure Region

After this it will install your Microsoft Azure Web App in the Cloud in a couple of seconds 🙂

 

When you open the Azure Portal you will see your App Service plan running.

From here you can configure your Azure Web App for Continues Delivery, and use different tools like VSC, Kudu or Azure App Service Editor.

Azure Web Apps enables you to build and host web applications in the programming language of your choice without managing infrastructure. It offers auto-scaling and high availability, supports both Windows and Linux, and enables automated deployments from GitHub, Visual Studio Team Services, or any Git repo.

Learn how to use Azure Web Apps with Microsoft quickstarts, tutorials, and samples.

Configure Continues Deployment from the Azure Portal.

Or
Continuous Deployment to Azure App Service

Developer tools from the Azure Portal with App Service Editor.

 

Azure App Services Editor

From here you can open Kudu to manage your Azure Web App and Debug via Console :

Kudu Debug console in CMD

Or Kudu Debug Console in Powershell 😉

Kudu Process Explorer

Here you find more information about Kudu for your Azure Web App on GitHub

And to come back at Microsoft Visual Studio Code, you can manage and Build your Azure Web App from here too :

Azure Web App Services in VSC

Hope this first step by step Guide is useful for you to start with Microsoft Azure Web App and Visual Studio Code to make your Pipeline.
More Information at Visual Studio Code

Azure Web Apps Overview


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#GlobalAzure BootCamp Day for the Community – Microsoft #Azure Overview Info

I wish everyone around the world an Awesome Global Azure BootCamp !

Here are some Microsoft Azure links for Information :

Create your Azure Free Account Today here

Microsoft Azure Get started documentation

Microsoft Azure Technical Docs Online

Microsoft Azure SDK – Tools

Microsoft Azure Architecture Information

Microsoft Virtual Academy

Microsoft Azure Training

Microsoft Azure Self-Paced Courses on Edx

Microsoft Azure Blog site

Microsoft Azure Marketplace

Microsoft Azure on GitHub

Microsoft Azure Friday on Channel 9

Follow on Twitter :

@Azure

@AzureBackup

@AzureSupport

@AzureCosmosDB

@Scottgu

@Markrussinovich

@CoreySandersWA

#MVPBuzz

@JamesvandenBerg

 


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Microsoft #Azure DevTest LAB is Great for #Education and #DevOps

Azure DevTest Labs can be used to implement many key scenarios in addition to dev/test. One of those scenarios is to set up a lab for training. Azure DevTest Labs allows you to create a lab where you can provide custom templates that each trainee can use to create identical and isolated environments for training. You can apply policies to ensure that training environments are available to each trainee only when they need them and contain enough resources – such as virtual machines – required for the training. Finally, you can easily share the lab with trainees, which they can access in one click.

To Create your own DevTest Lab is easy in Microsoft Azure subscription :

Select Developer tools and then DevTest Labs

Give you DevTest Lab a Name and Resource

I already got it installed with some Virtual Machines.

When you go to Configuration and Policies you can configure your DevTest LAB for your Users.

From here you can manage and Configure your DevTest LAB.

Costs per Resource and who is the Owner

You can give your DevTest LAB Users full Control on Virtual Machine Sizes, but then you have to watch your Costs.
To keep you in Control you can decide which VM sizes can be selected by the DevTest LAB Users. From small standard A2 VM
or Powerful GS5 Virtual Machine.

Then you can select how much Virtual Machines can be selected by the DevTest LAB User or How Much Virtual Machines can be added to a Complete DevTest LAB :

Virtual Machines Per User

Virtual Machines per LAB

Here you can make a DevTest LAB Announcement for the Users.

To keep you Costs in a efficient way in Control, you can Auto Shutdown the Complete LAB and Start it with a Scheduler again.
Then you don’t pay for Compute when It’s not in use, this keeps your total costs low.

Auto Start

Auto Shutdown

Important for your Azure DevTest LAB are the Images form the Market Place but you can also upload your own custom images :

Azure Market Place

Of course you can add also Repositories to your Azure DevTest LAB :

When you installed this all, you can configure your Identity and Access Management for your Azure DevTest LAB Users.

I Gave Student01 the Role DevTest Lab User.

When you Login with the Azure DevTest LAB User you see your Resources and the LAB.

In the Activity Log you can see what is happening in your LAB.

For Teachers in Education is Microsoft Azure DevTest LAB a Great solution to work with IT Students and Develop or making there own Projects for School.

Here you see how easy you can role out a Kali-Linux Virtual Machine in your Azure DevTest LAB 

Select the Kali-Linux Image

Select your Virtual Machine Settings

Here you can select Artifacts for in your VM

You can download your JSON ARM Template here

Your Kali-Linux VM is Creating in your Azure DevTest LAB.

I like Microsoft Azure DevTest LAB a lot and I hope you too 🙂

More information about Microsoft Azure DevTest LAB is here on Docs


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UPDATE on Project Honolulu with Jeff Woolsey @WSV_GUY #Winserv #Hyperv #Azure

In this episode, Microsoft takes a look at updates to Project Honolulu and PowerShell Core to manage your server infrastructure. Jeff Woolsey explains the updates IT pros will want to know about and demonstrates what’s new in Project Honolulu – including Remote Desktop Protocol, Windows client management and PowerShell support. Speaking of PowerShell, Jeff also shows how everything has evolved to PowerShell Core, so you can manage your Windows and Linux workloads from one unified scripting place. You’ll even see how with a single cmdlet, you can talk to both Windows and Linux machines and get cross-platform joined outputs.

More information about Microsoft Project Honolulu

Project Honolulu is a flexible, lightweight browser-based locally-deployed platform and a solution for management scenarios. One of Microsoft goals with Project Honolulu is to make it simpler and easier to connect existing deployments of Windows Server to Azure services. With Windows Server 2019 and Project Honolulu, customers will be able to easily integrate Azure services such as Azure Backup, Azure File Sync, disaster recovery, and much more so they will be able to leverage these Azure services without disrupting their applications and infrastructure.

Introducing Windows Server 2019 – now available in preview

Evaluate Project Honolulu


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AWESOME #Microsoft Azure E-Books for your #Cloud Journey Today #Azure #AzureStack

Download Azure Strategy and Implementation Guide Here

Each organization has a unique journey to the cloud based on its own starting point, its history, its culture, and its goals. This document is designed to meet you wherever you are on that journey and help you build or reinforce a solid foundation around cloud application development and operations, service management, and governance.  An important concept covered in this book is a strategy for identifying and moving specific workloads based on their actual value to the business. Some emerge in a new form infused with cloud design principals that were otherwise not available in the past. Others receive targeted improvements to extend their lifetimes. Still others move as-is, using the “lift and shift” approach that requires minimal change. Because of the unique capabilities of the Microsoft Cloud and the Microsoft Azure platform, workloads that must remain on-premises because of latency or compliance requirements can fully participate in the journey because of the ability for an organization to run Azure services on-premises using Azure Stack. A Great E-book to Start your journey to the Cloud

Download The Developers Guide to Microsoft Azure SE here

Microsoft created The Developer’s Guide to Microsoft Azure to help you on your journey to the cloud, whether you’re just considering making the move or you’ve already decided and are underway. This eBook was written by developers for developers. And it is specifically meant to give you, as a developer, a fundamental knowledge of what Azure is all about, what it offers you and your organization and how to take advantage of it all.

Download the Microsoft Azure Virtual Datacenter E-Book here

This guide is intended for enterprise IT architects and executives. Using the lens of the physical datacenter, the guide discusses an approach to designing secure, trusted virtual datacenters on the Azure platform. Azure Virtual Datacenter is not a specific product or service but rather a way to think about cloud infrastructures. It offers proven practices and guidance to help smooth your migration to the cloud. At the end of this guide, you can learn about the upcoming Virtual Datacenter Automation guidance. This guidance includes a collection of scripts and Azure Resource Manager templates that will help you build an Azure Virtual Datacenter using the trusted extension model.

Download the Microsoft azure Virtual Datacenter Lift and Shift Guide here

This guide is a starting point when considering the migration of existing applications and services. The processes described below are meant to be iterative. By working to identify a first round of candidates for lift and shift, you will build an understanding of what’s required to host and maintain applications in Azure, along with increasing the accuracy of cost estimates. This knowledge will make identifying subsequent candidates much easier. Note that the Azure platform is continuously adding features and services, and costs can change (generally lower) as new capabilities come online. Although applications and services might not be candidates for lift and shift migrations now, they might be in the future, and any iterative review process should take platform changes into account.

May these Awesome Azure E-books help you to build your Cloud Services Today


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#Microsoft Azure CloudShell Bash in Visual Studio Code #Azure #VSC #DevOps

 

When you don’t have Microsoft Visual Studio Code, It’s a Awesome Open Source Free tool for DevOps and ITPro.

https://code.visualstudio.com/download

When you installed VSC you can add Extensions to your Visual Studio Code and one of them is Called Azure Account.
When you Add this extension you can connect to Microsoft Azure Cloud Shell in Visual Studio Code.
But before we can use this Extension to connect to Azure CloudShell we need NodeJS version 6 or higher installed on your OS.

Go to NodeJS and Download

Click Next.

Accept the Terms and click Next.

Click Next

Click Next

It will also install a Shortcut for the online documentation of this version of NodeJS v9.6.1

Click on Install

Click Finish

With Ctrl+Shift+P you will see all the Commands. (1)
Choose for Azure: Open Bash in CloudShell (2)

When you do this it will make a Microsoft Azure Device Login first to Connect to your Azure Subscription like this :

Type the code which is in VSC here

Azure will see that you connect with Visual Studio Code.
Click on Continue.

Login with your Azure Account of your Subscription.

The Connection with VSC and Azure is made.

Now when you choose Azure: Bash in CloudShell again it will show the Azure Cloud Shell in your VSC.

Your are Online with Azure Cloud Shell.

Just Awesome 😉
Cheers James