Cloud and Datacenter Management Blog

Microsoft Hybrid Cloud blogsite about Management


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Installing and Maintaining #Azure Kubernetes Cluster with Multi Pool Nodes (Preview) for #Linux #Winserv Containers

Install AKS-Preview extension via Azure Cloudshell

NOTE ! This is a Preview blogpost, do not use in production! (only for test environments)

To create an AKS cluster that can use multiple node pools and run Windows Server containers, first enable the WindowsPreview feature flags on your subscription. The WindowsPreview feature also uses multi-node pool clusters and virtual machine scale set to manage the deployment and configuration of the Kubernetes nodes. Register the WindowsPreview feature flag using the az feature register command as shown in the following example:

I Have registered the following Preview Features from the Azure CloudShell :

  • az feature register –name WindowsPreview –namespace Microsoft.ContainerService
  • az feature register –name MultiAgentpoolPreview –namespace Microsoft.ContainerService
  • az feature register –name VMSSPreview –namespace Microsoft.ContainerService

This will take a few minutes and you can check the registration with the following command :

az feature list -o table –query “[?contains(name, ‘Microsoft.ContainerService/WindowsPreview’)].{Name:name,State:properties.state}”

When ready, refresh the registration of the Microsoft.ContainerService resource provider using the az provider register command:

 

Creating Azure Kubernetes Cluster

First you create a Resource Group in the right Azure Region for your AKS Cluster to run:

az group create –name myResourceGroup –location eastus

I created Resource Group KubeCon in location West-Europe.

Creating KubeCluster

With the following CLI command in Azure Cloudshell, I created the Kubernetes Cluster with a single node:

$PASSWORD_WIN=”P@ssw0rd1234″

az aks create –resource-group KubeCon –name KubeCluster –node-count 1 –enable-addons monitoring –kubernetes-version 1.14.0 –generate-ssh-keys –windows-admin-password $PASSWORD_WIN –windows-admin-username azureuser –enable-vmss –network-plugin azure

The Azure Kubernetes Cluster “KubeCluster” is created in the resource group “KubeCon” in a view minutes.

Adding a Windows Pool

Adding a Windows Server Node Pool

By default, an AKS cluster is created with a node pool that can run Linux containers. Use az aks nodepool add command to add an additional node pool that can run Windows Server containers.

az aks nodepool add –resource-group KubeCon –cluster-name KubeCluster –os-type Windows –name pool02 –node-count 1 –kubernetes-version 1.14.0

I added the Windows Server Pool via the Azure Portal.

When this has finished, we have an Azure Kubernetes Cluster with Multi node Pools for Linux and Windows Server Containers :

Pools for Linux and Windows Server Containers

The following will be created in Microsoft Azure too :

VNET, NSG and Virtual Machine Scale Set (VMSS)

Azure Monitor for containers is a feature designed to monitor the performance of container workloads deployed to either Azure Container Instances or managed Kubernetes clusters hosted on Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS). Monitoring your containers is critical, especially when you’re running a production cluster, at scale, with multiple applications.
Azure Monitor for containers gives you performance visibility by collecting memory and processor metrics from controllers, nodes, and containers that are available in Kubernetes through the Metrics API. Container logs are also collected. After you enable monitoring from Kubernetes clusters, these metrics and logs are automatically collected for you through a containerized version of the Log Analytics agent for Linux and stored in your Log Analytics workspace.

Container Insights Monitoring of the Linux Node

Container Insights Monitoring of the Windows Server Node

Here you can read all about Azure Monitoring with Container Insights

Scaling Multi Pool Node AKS Cluster

To Scale your Multi Pool Node AKS Cluster, you need to do this via the Azure Cloudshell CLI.

Here you see the two pools ( Linux and Windows Server)

Scaling up the Windows Server Pool

You can do this with the following command :

az aks nodepool scale –resource-group KubeCon –cluster-name KubeCluster –name pool02 –node-count 2 –no-wait

Scaling

Scaling Succesful after a few minutes

Upgrading Windows Server Pool Instance

When I scaled the Cluster there was a update released by Microsoft.

Windows Server Pool Instances

Just Click on Upgrade

Upgrade is Done 😉


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Microsoft Windows #Containers a New Ecosystem for #Developers and #ITpro

Container Channel9

Applications fuel innovation in the cloud and mobile era. Containers, and the ecosystem that is developing around them, will empower software developers to create the next generation of applications experiences, while IT Pros can use containers to provide standardized environments for their development, QA, and production teams, creating an infrastructure that is simpler to update and maintain.

The Containers Video Channel

DockerAndAzureEcosystem

Microsoft Windows Containers Documentation Site


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The Microsoft Containers Video Channel Collection on @Ch9 #Containers #Docker #WindowsServer2016

The Container Video Channel

Applications fuel innovation in the cloud and mobile era. Containers, and the ecosystem that is developing around them, will empower software developers to create the next generation of applications experiences, while IT Pros can use containers to provide standardized environments for their development, QA, and production teams, creating an infrastructure that is simpler to update and maintain.

Here you go to the Microsoft Containers Video Channel with lot of videos

MSFT Containers

Here you find Microsoft Containers Overview and step-by-step instructions


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#Microsoft Windows Containers Overview #Hyperv #Azure #Winserv

Containers

Windows containers provide operating system level virtualization that allow you to run multiple isolated applications on one container host.

Here you find the Microsoft MSDN website about Windows Containers

Quick Start: Windows Server Containers and PowerShell

This article will walk through the fundamentals of managing Windows Server Containers with PowerShell. Items covered will include creating Windows Server Containers and Windows Server Container Images, removing Windows Server Containers and Container Images and finally deploying an application into a Windows Server Container. The lessons learned in this walkthrough should enable you to begin exploring deployment and management of Windows Server Containers using PowerShell.

Containers_Powershell_Video

Here you can find the complete Quick Start for Windows Server Containers and Powershell

Here you can find the Complete Quick Start for Windows Server Containers and Docker

Windows Server containers, Docker, and an introduction to Azure Container Service Video

Containers_banner