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Microsoft #Azure CloudShell for Management tasks #Bash #Powershell #CLI #KubeCtl #Terraform

https://shell.azure.com

Azure Cloud Shell is an interactive, browser-accessible shell for managing Azure resources. It provides the flexibility of choosing the shell experience that best suits the way you work. Linux users can opt for a Bash experience, while Windows users can opt for PowerShell.

In this quick overview you will see the possibilities of Microsoft Azure Cloudshell functionalities and tools.

Azure Cloudshell Editor

Azure Cloud Shell includes an integrated file editor built from the open-source Monaco Editor. The Cloud Shell editor supports features such as language highlighting, the command palette, and a file explorer.
This can be handy with JSON and YAML files.

 

When you have your App YAML file for your Azure Kubernetes Cluster on your Cloud drive, you can edit the file online with your browser and save it in the Azure Cloud. I like this editor in the Cloudshell, especially when you are not behind your own laptop or pc and you have to make a quick change.

I have a Kubernetes Cluster installed on Azure and with this editor I can explore my Azure logs, Cache, and config files for the information I need to work with in Bash, Powershell to do my CLI commands for example 😉

For the Powershell Gurus 

Azure PowerShell provides a set of cmdlets that use the Azure Resource Manager model for managing your Azure resources. Learn here more about Azure Powershell

Azure Kubernetes CLI Kubectl

Kubectl is a command line interface for running commands against Kubernetes clusters. kubectl looks for a file named config in the $HOME/.kube directory. You can specify other kubeconfig files by setting the KUBECONFIG environment variable or by setting the –kubeconfig flag.
Read here more about Kubectl

Terraform CLI is Available

What is Terraform?
Terraform is a tool for building, changing, and versioning infrastructure safely and efficiently. Terraform can manage existing and popular service providers as well as custom in-house solutions.
Configuration files describe to Terraform the components needed to run a single application or your entire datacenter. Terraform generates an execution plan describing what it will do to reach the desired state, and then executes it to build the described infrastructure. As the configuration changes, Terraform is able to determine what changed and create incremental execution plans which can be applied.
The infrastructure Terraform can manage includes low-level components such as compute instances, storage, and networking, as well as high-level components such as DNS entries, SaaS features, etc.

The key features of Terraform are:

Infrastructure as Code
Infrastructure is described using a high-level configuration syntax. This allows a blueprint of your datacenter to be versioned and treated as you would any other code. Additionally, infrastructure can be shared and re-used.

Execution Plans
Terraform has a “planning” step where it generates an execution plan. The execution plan shows what Terraform will do when you call apply. This lets you avoid any surprises when Terraform manipulates infrastructure.

Resource Graph
Terraform builds a graph of all your resources, and parallelizes the creation and modification of any non-dependent resources. Because of this, Terraform builds infrastructure as efficiently as possible, and operators get insight into dependencies in their infrastructure.

Change Automation
Complex changesets can be applied to your infrastructure with minimal human interaction. With the previously mentioned execution plan and resource graph, you know exactly what Terraform will change and in what order, avoiding many possible human errors.

More information on Terraform

It’s really easy to Upload or Download your Files.

AzCopy is a command-line utility designed for copying data to/from Microsoft Azure Blob, File, and Table storage, using simple commands designed for optimal performance. You can copy data between a file system and a storage account, or between storage accounts.

More information about Features & tools for Azure Cloud Shell here

Conclusion :

Microsoft Azure Cloudshell is very powerful to work with, creating your infrastructure from the Command Line Interface (CLI) or with JSON / YAML scripts. Some features or commands are not available in the Azure portal and that’s where Azure Cloudshell can help you out. Try the different Azure Cloudshell Tools and look what you like most to use for your work. From here you can work on any device with a browser and do your work. #MVPBuzz


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Creating VM Cluster on Azure #Cloud with Terraform #IaC #Azure #Terraform #Linux #Winserv

Type az and you should see this Azure CLI

Type Terraform and you should see the terraform commands

 

Install and configure Terraform to provision VMs and other infrastructure into Azure

Before you begin with Terraform and deploying your solution to Microsoft Azure you have to install Azure CLI and Terraform for your OS.

In the following step-by-step guide we will deploy a VM Cluster with Terraform into Microsoft Azure Cloud Services.

First we open Powershell in Administrator mode :

You should have your Terraform script ready.

It’s great to edit your Terraform script in Visual Studio Code

Create a Terraform configuration file
In this section, you create a file that contains resource definitions for your infrastructure.
Create a new file named main.tf.
Copy following sample resource definitions into the newly created main.tf file:


resource “azurerm_resource_group” “test” {
name = “acctestrg”
location = “West US 2”
}

resource “azurerm_virtual_network” “test” {
name = “acctvn”
address_space = [“10.0.0.0/16”]
location = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.location}”
resource_group_name = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.name}”
}

resource “azurerm_subnet” “test” {
name = “acctsub”
resource_group_name = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.name}”
virtual_network_name = “${azurerm_virtual_network.test.name}”
address_prefix = “10.0.2.0/24”
}

resource “azurerm_public_ip” “test” {
name = “publicIPForLB”
location = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.location}”
resource_group_name = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.name}”
public_ip_address_allocation = “static”
}

resource “azurerm_lb” “test” {
name = “loadBalancer”
location = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.location}”
resource_group_name = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.name}”

frontend_ip_configuration {
name = “publicIPAddress”
public_ip_address_id = “${azurerm_public_ip.test.id}”
}
}

resource “azurerm_lb_backend_address_pool” “test” {
resource_group_name = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.name}”
loadbalancer_id = “${azurerm_lb.test.id}”
name = “BackEndAddressPool”
}

resource “azurerm_network_interface” “test” {
count = 2
name = “acctni${count.index}”
location = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.location}”
resource_group_name = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.name}”

ip_configuration {
name = “testConfiguration”
subnet_id = “${azurerm_subnet.test.id}”
private_ip_address_allocation = “dynamic”
load_balancer_backend_address_pools_ids = [“${azurerm_lb_backend_address_pool.test.id}”]
}
}

resource “azurerm_managed_disk” “test” {
count = 2
name = “datadisk_existing_${count.index}”
location = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.location}”
resource_group_name = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.name}”
storage_account_type = “Standard_LRS”
create_option = “Empty”
disk_size_gb = “1023”
}

resource “azurerm_availability_set” “avset” {
name = “avset”
location = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.location}”
resource_group_name = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.name}”
platform_fault_domain_count = 2
platform_update_domain_count = 2
managed = true
}

resource “azurerm_virtual_machine” “test” {
count = 2
name = “acctvm${count.index}”
location = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.location}”
availability_set_id = “${azurerm_availability_set.avset.id}”
resource_group_name = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.name}”
network_interface_ids = [“${element(azurerm_network_interface.test.*.id, count.index)}”]
vm_size = “Standard_DS1_v2”

# Uncomment this line to delete the OS disk automatically when deleting the VM
# delete_os_disk_on_termination = true

# Uncomment this line to delete the data disks automatically when deleting the VM
# delete_data_disks_on_termination = true

storage_image_reference {
publisher = “Canonical”
offer = “UbuntuServer”
sku = “16.04-LTS”
version = “latest”
}

storage_os_disk {
name = “myosdisk${count.index}”
caching = “ReadWrite”
create_option = “FromImage”
managed_disk_type = “Standard_LRS”
}

# Optional data disks
storage_data_disk {
name = “datadisk_new_${count.index}”
managed_disk_type = “Standard_LRS”
create_option = “Empty”
lun = 0
disk_size_gb = “1023”
}

storage_data_disk {
name = “${element(azurerm_managed_disk.test.*.name, count.index)}”
managed_disk_id = “${element(azurerm_managed_disk.test.*.id, count.index)}”
create_option = “Attach”
lun = 1
disk_size_gb = “${element(azurerm_managed_disk.test.*.disk_size_gb, count.index)}”
}

os_profile {
computer_name = “hostname”
admin_username = “testadmin”
admin_password = “Password1234!”
}

os_profile_linux_config {
disable_password_authentication = false
}

tags {
environment = “staging”
}
}


Type : terraform init

You should see this screen.

Type : az login

We now logging into Microsoft Azure subscription.

https://microsoft.com/devicelogin

Insert the code from your Powershell screen.

Now we have the Terraform INIT running and we are connected to our Azure Subscription 😉

Type : terraform plan

It will refreshing the state and getting ready for deployment.

Type : terraform apply

and then type : yes <enter>

Terraform is now creating the azure resources

Azure resource group acctestrg is made

Terraform deployment VM Cluster on Azure is Ready 😉

Azure VM Cluster is running.

When you want to remove the complete Azure VM Cluster with terraform, it’s really easy :

Type : terraform destroy

and then type : yes <enter>

Azure resources are being deleted via terraform script

Terraform destroyed the Azure VM Cluster


All Azure Resources of the VM Cluster are removed.

Hope this step-by-step guide deploying infrastructure as Code with terraform will help you with your own Cloud solutions in Microsoft azure.

Ps. don’t forget to install Visual Studio Code Azure Terraform extension and play !

#MVPbuzz