Cloud and Datacenter Management Blog

Microsoft Hybrid Cloud blogsite about Management


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How to Migrate your VDI Infrastructure to #Azure Windows Virtual Desktop #WVD

Azure Migrate VDI to Windows Virtual Desktop (WVD)

Microsoft Azure Migrate services makes the transition to Azure Cloud services for customers easier to make the right decisions after you did an assessment.

Assessment and migration feature available in Azure Migrate Portal:

  • Servers: Assess on-premises servers and migrate them to Azure virtual machines.
  • Databases: Assess on-premises databases and migrate them to Azure SQL Database or to an Azure SQL Database managed instance.
  • Web applications: Assess on-premises web applications and migrate them to Azure App Service by using the Azure App Service Migration Assistant.
  • Virtual desktops: Assess your on-premises virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) and migrate it to Windows Virtual Desktop in Azure.
  • Data: Migrate large amounts of data to Azure quickly and cost-effectively using Azure Data Box products.

Lakeside SysTrack assessment tool for VDI

One of the feature is the Assessment and Migration of VDI ( Microsoft RDS, VMware, Citrix ) to Azure Windows Virtual Desktop Cloud infrastructure.
Lakeside Software’s Windows Virtual Desktop Assessment with SysTrack is a cloud hosted data analytics solution that enables IT to capture detailed metrics and data about end user environments. This on-demand tool provides IT with a self service platform to assess and quantify user, application and infrastructure requirements in order to successfully transform a desktop environment. Leveraging this tool, IT can accelerate time to value and ensure that their environments are right-sized to best meet end user requirements.

In the Following Microsoft Mechanics video you see How to migrate Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) to Azure and Windows Virtual Desktop :

Hope this will help you with your transition to the Microsoft Azure Cloud 👍😎🚀

Windows Virtual Desktop Docs


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Deploy a 10 – Node Azure Service Fabric Standalone Cluster #microservices #Containers

Azure Service Fabric Standalone Cluster

Earlier I wrote a blogpost about Microsoft Azure Service Fabric Standalone Cluster for Dev testing.
This was 5 – Node Azure Service Fabric Cluster locally installed, but now I like to have a bigger ASF Cluster on my
Windows Server 2019 for testing with Visual Studio.

When you have downloaded the Microsoft Azure Service Fabric SDK into a directory

Here you see the JSON Cluster config files

I used the same JSON template for deploying a Azure Service Fabric Standalone Cluster :

Creating Cluster but with a Changed JSON Template.

Here you find the 10 – Node Azure Service Fabric Cluster Config file on Github

10 – Node Microsoft Azure Service Fabric Standalone Cluster for Dev Testing

Important : Use this Azure Service Fabric Standalone Cluster only for Learning and testing and not for production!

Here you find more information and documentation about Azure Service Fabric for Production.


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Microsoft Azure Service Fabric Standalone Cluster for Testing #microservices #Containers #Apps

Microsoft Azure Service Fabric standalone

Azure Service Fabric is a distributed systems platform that makes it easy to package, deploy, and manage scalable and reliable microservices and containers.

To build and run Azure Service Fabric applications on your Windows development machine, install the Service Fabric runtime, SDK, and tools. You also need to enable execution of the Windows PowerShell scripts included in the SDK.

I have installed the latest version :

  • Service Fabric SDK and Tools 4.1.409
  • Service Fabric runtime 7.1.409

here you find more information about installing Azure Service Fabric Standalone version for testing
I have installed the Azure Service Fabric Cluster on my Windows10 Machine for testing only.

When you want to great your own Azure Service Fabric Cluster for Production, you have to prepare your self and making a plan before you build.

When you have your Azure Service Fabric Standalone Cluster running, you want to deploy your microservices, apps or containers on it and test your solution. In the following steps I deploy with Visual Studio a Web App to Azure Service Fabric Cluster Standalone version 7.1.409

Here is a Github Sample for Azure Service Fabric.

git clone https://github.com/Azure-Samples/service-fabric-dotnet-quickstart

Here you have your Clone from Github.

To deploy this App to the Azure Service Fabric Cluster we use Microsoft Visual Studio

Once the application is downloaded, you can deploy it to a cluster directly from Visual Studio.

  1. Open Visual Studio
  2. Select File > Open
  3. Navigate to the folder you cloned the git repository to, and select Voting.sln
  4. Right-click on the Voting application project in the Solution Explorer and choose Publish

Click on Publish.

Select connection Endpoint Local Cluster and click on Publish.

The Web App is Published to the Azure Service Fabric Standalone Cluster.

When you open the Azure Service Fabric Explorer you will see your App Running

This sample is for testing only and is not secure for production, just to learn how it works 😉

Of course you can also deploy Containers with Visual Studio to your Azure Service Fabric Standalone Cluster.

Deploying Service Fabric Container via Visual Studio.

More Azure Service Fabric information

Here you find the Azure Service Fabric documentation

Here you find the Microsoft Azure Service Fabric website

Here you find the Azure Service Fabric Tech Community Blog

Happy Testing your Apps, microservices, and Containers.

Join the Containers in the Cloud LinkedIn Community Group

 


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Microsoft Azure Monitor Overview #Cloud #Analytics #Hybrid #AzOps #Azure

Microsoft Azure Monitor

Monitor, diagnose, and gain insight into the performance and availability of your applications and services with Azure Monitor. In this video, you’ll learn how to use Azure Monitor to collect, analyze and act on telemetry from your cloud and on-premises environments.

Learn how to create time series charts of platform and resource metrics for visualization and analysis with Azure Monitor. Start in Azure Monitor to view metrics across multiple resources or start directly from individual resource blades. You will also learn how to add metrics charts to dashboards in the Azure portal for real-time monitoring and shared access across teams.

In this video, learn about action rules and how you can use them to configure actions and notifications for multiple alerts at scale across a subscription, resource group, and target resource.

In this video, learn how alerts enable you to proactively identify and address issues before it impacts the users of your system. Alerts are created on performance and availability data and can be associated with user-defined actions and notification mechanisms.

In this video, learn how to use source map support in Azure Monitor Application Insights to improve the diagnosis of client-side JavaScript errors. Source maps can be used to unminify call stacks found on the Application Insights end to end transaction details page.

Here you find more information about Microsoft Azure Monitor:


Microsoft Azure Monitor Documentation 

 

Get Started with Microsoft Azure Monitor

Follow Azure Monitor on Twitter 

Microsoft Azure Monitor & Security for Hybrid IT Community Group on LinkedIn

Keep in control of IT with Microsoft Azure Monitor


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Windows Insiders – WSL 2 – Windows Terminal #WIMVP #WindowsInsiders #Kali #Azure

Windows Insiders Preview Build 19613

If you like to test the new features of Windows 10 and give feedback to the Microsoft product team, then the Windows Insiders Program is the place to Join. Here you can become a Windows Insider

I’m a Windows Insider since 2014 and a Windows Insider MVP since July 2019 and I love the collaboration with the Community and with the Microsoft Product Team to make a better product like Windows 10 together.

On my windows Insiders Build version 19613, I like to have my tools and Apps installed like :

I’m in the Microsoft Windows Insiders FAST Ring, and I want to test everything like Windows 10 operating system but my Tools must also be working on every new Windows Insiders Build.

Installing WSL 2 and Windows Terminal on Windows Insider Build version

Open Powerhell in Administrator modus

dism.exe /online /enable-feature /featurename:Microsoft-WindowsSubsystem-Linux /all /norestart

dism.exe /online /enable-feature /featurename:VirtualMachinePlatform /all /norestart

When both dism commands are successfully completed, you have to restart your machine.

wsl –set-default-version 2

Now you have set WSL 2 version in the basic, but you have to install a Linux distro where you can find
here in the Microsoft Store

I installed Kali Linux distro from the Microsoft Store.

Enter a New User name and password.

Kali Linux distro is now running on WSL 2 on my Windows Insiders Build.

One of the Cool features in Windows Insiders Build version 19613 is that you can use your File explorer for Kali Linux 😉


Linux in Windows Insider Explorer.

Exploring Kali Linux

And of course updating the Kali Linux distro with

Sudo apt-get update

And at last…….

sudo apt-get upgrade

The Next tool is Windows Terminal (Preview) from the Microsoft Store

Just Click on Get ( in the Microsoft Store)

Click on Launch

This Windows Terminal Preview version on Windows Insiders can run :

  • Command Prompt
  • Powershell
  • Kali Linux distro (WSL 2)
  • Azure CloudShell

From here I can Manage and Install Microsoft Azure Cloud Services with Cloud Shell running on my Windows Insiders Build
for testing all the new features and this goes really easy :

Click next to PowerShell in the pulldown bar on Azure Cloud Shell and copy the Code
into the next URL https://microsoft.com/devicelogin

Enter here your Code from Windows Terminal.

Done you are logged-In Azure via Windows Terminal on Windows Insiders Build.

Azure Cloud Shell in Windows Terminal 😉

Conclusion

The Windows Insiders Program is Awesome to join when you like to test the Newest features of Windows 10 but also the Tools and applications running on the newest Windows Insiders Build version are Cool. When you work with Fast ring releases and Preview versions of tools you can hit a bug, or something is not working. That’s the moment you give feedback in the Windows Insider Feedback HUB to support the Microsoft Windows Insiders Product Team to fix the Bug.

Together we are building for the future of Windows 10 !

Windows Insider Program Feedback Hub.

And as a Windows Insider you can earn Badges for your Support 😉


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Docker Linux Container running on Windows Server 2019 #Winserv #Docker #Containers

In the following steps we install Docker for Windows enterprise on a Windows Server 2019 which is running on a hypervisor platform in this case VMware to run a Linux container in the Datacenter.

When you are on a virtualization platform like Hyper-V or VMware and you have installed de Virtual machine with Microsoft Windows Server 2019 Standard edition, you must make the virtual processors ready for virtualization.
(Nested Virtualization) otherwise you can’t install Hyper-V on VMware.

This is the error you get.

Enable this feature for virtualization to the guest OS for VMware.

When you run Microsoft Hyper-V you have to activate nested virtualization

It’s like this in PowerShell : Set-VMProcessor -VMName <VMName> -ExposeVirtualizationExtensions $true

Before you install Docker enterprise for Windows Server you have to install the Hyper-V Role and the Container Feature:

Hyper-V Role Installed

Containers Feature installed.

via Powershell is like this :

Install-WindowsFeature -Name Hyper-V,Containers -IncludeAllSubFeature -IncludeManagementTools

Now we have all the prerequisites installed on Microsoft Windows Server 2019, we can begin with Docker for Windows Enterprise via Powershell in Administrators modus :

Command: Install-Module DockerMSFTProvider

Then you type the following commands:

Import-Module -Name DockerMSFTProvider -Force

Import-Packageprovider -Name DockerMSFTProvider -Force

Command: Install-Package -Name Docker -Source DockerDefault

Now we have Docker EE version 19.03.5 installed for Windows Server 2019.

It’s ready for Windows Containers.

But we want to run linux containers,

Now that we have Docker installed, we need to make some changes to the default configuration to enable support for Linux Containers. This involves setting an Environment variable and creating a docker daemon configuration file.

—————————————————-

# Set LCOW_SUPPORTED Variable to 1 for enabled

[Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable(“LCOW_SUPPORTED”, “1”, “Machine”)

 # Enable Experimental Features in Docker daemon.conf

$configfile = @”

{

    “experimental”: true

}

“@

$configfile|Out-File -FilePath C:\ProgramData\docker\config\daemon.json -Encoding ascii -Force

——————————————————

Because Linux Containers still need a Linux kernel, we need to deploy LCOW for it to run :

Invoke-WebRequest -Uri “https://github.com/linuxkit/lcow/releases/download/v4.14.35-v0.3.9/release.zip&#8221; -UseBasicParsing -OutFile release.zip

Expand-Archive release.zip -DestinationPath “$Env:ProgramFiles\Linux Containers\.”

Now you have to reboot the Server.

Ready for running Linux Containers.

To make Linux containers the Default you can set this environment setting :

[Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable(“LCOW_API_PLATFORM_IF_OMITTED”, “linux”, “Machine”)

Here you can read how to Pull docker Linux images to your Docker Host on Windows Server 2019

What is handy to use is Microsoft Visual Studio Code with the Docker Extension.

Wish you all the Best with Deploying Containers.


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Microsoft Azure Resource Graph is a Powerful Tool #Azure #Cloud #AzOps #Kusto #PowerShell

Welcome to Azure Resource Graph

Azure Resource Graph is a service in Azure that is designed to extend Azure Resource Management by providing efficient and performance resource exploration with the ability to query at scale across a given set of subscriptions so that you can effectively govern your environment. Azure Resource Graph enables full visibility into your environments by providing high performance and powerful query capability across all your resources.

From here you can experience the power of Azure Resource Graph by doing it yourself.

Https://shell.azure.com

You can use Microsoft Azure Resource Graph with different language support like :

  • With Azure CLI
  • With PowerShell
  • With Kusto in Azure Resource Graph Explorer

Start here when you like to work with Microsoft Azure CLI

From here we are going further with Azure PowerShell and Azure Resource Graph in CloudShell.
Login to https://shell.azure.com

Type following command : Install-Module -Name Az.ResourceGraph

Type Y

Type the Following Command: Get-Command -Module ‘Az.ResourceGraph’ -CommandType ‘Cmdlet’

From here we can start with Search in Azure Resource Graph

The first step to understanding queries with Azure Resource Graph is a basic understanding of the Query Language. If you aren’t already familiar with Azure Data Explorer, it’s recommended to review the basics to understand how to compose requests for the resources you’re looking for.

Samples


Command : Search-AzGraph -Query ‘Resources | project name, type | limit 5’

Without the Limit 5 you get all of your resources.

Command: Search-AzGraph -Query ‘Resources | project name, type | limit 10 | order by name asc’

Command: Search-AzGraph -Query “Resources | summarize count()”


Command: Search-AzGraph -Query “Resources | project name, location, type| where type =~ ‘Microsoft.Compute/virtualMachines’ | order by name desc”

Command: Search-AzGraph -Query “Resources | where type =~ ‘Microsoft.Compute/virtualMachines’ | project name, properties.storageProfile.osDisk.osType | top 15 by name desc”


Command: Search-AzGraph -Query “Resources | where type contains ‘publicIPAdresses’ and isnotempty(properties.ipAddress) | project properties.ipAddress | limit 100”

Handy to see your External IP Addresses in Azure 😉


Command: Search-AzGraph -Query “Resources | where tags.environment=~’internal’ | project name”

To find tour Tagged Resources in Azure.


Microsoft Azure Resource Graph Explorer in the Portal.

Here you can make your kusto queries and save them for Colleagues by sharing them.

Sharing your Kusto queries

Resources
| where type =~ ‘microsoft.compute/virtualmachines’
| extend nics=array_length(properties.networkProfile.networkInterfaces)
| mv-expand nic=properties.networkProfile.networkInterfaces
| where nics == 1 or nic.properties.primary =~ ‘true’ or isempty(nic)
| project vmId = id, vmName = name, vmSize=tostring(properties.hardwareProfile.vmSize), nicId = tostring(nic.id)
| join kind=leftouter (
Resources
| where type =~ ‘microsoft.network/networkinterfaces’
| extend ipConfigsCount=array_length(properties.ipConfigurations)
| mv-expand ipconfig=properties.ipConfigurations
| where ipConfigsCount == 1 or ipconfig.properties.primary =~ ‘true’
| project nicId = id, publicIpId = tostring(ipconfig.properties.publicIPAddress.id))
on nicId
| project-away nicId1
| summarize by vmId, vmName, vmSize, nicId, publicIpId
| join kind=leftouter (
Resources
| where type =~ ‘microsoft.network/publicipaddresses’
| project publicIpId = id, publicIpAddress = properties.ipAddress)
on publicIpId
| project-away publicIpId1

More information about Microsoft Azure Resource Graph Explorer

Conclusion

When you are the Microsoft Azure Administrator, the Resource Graph Explorer can be really Powerful and fast to get the right information you are looking for. When you invest in the kusto queries your can save them and Share with your Colleagues to serve your business needs. Hope this is useful for you and happy Scripting with Kusto, Powershell or Azure CLI in the Cloud


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#Microsoft Virtual Training Day | NL #Azure #Winserv #Cloud and More!

Microsoft Virtual Training Day | NL this Wednesday March 11th. This day will be full of technical sessions based on our Microsoft Learning Paths.

Explore the tracks

We offer 7 tracks including 5 sessions per track, based on the Learning Paths of Azure Cloud Native, Azure Data, Azure Infra & Ops, Business Applications, Power Platform, Modern Workplace and Surface. On the day itself you can join sessions of different tracks. Please register your sessions here :

http://aka.ms/mvtd


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Microsoft #Azure Private Link to your #Cloud Services

Azure Private Link provides the following benefits:

  • Privately access services on the Azure platform: Connect your virtual network to services in Azure without a public IP address at the source or destination. Service providers can render their services in their own virtual network and consumers can access those services in their local virtual network. The Private Link platform will handle the connectivity between the consumer and services over the Azure backbone network.
  • On-premises and peered networks: Access services running in Azure from on-premises over ExpressRoute private peering, VPN tunnels, and peered virtual networks using private endpoints. There’s no need to set up public peering or traverse the internet to reach the service. Private Link provides a secure way to migrate workloads to Azure.
  • Protection against data leakage: A private endpoint is mapped to an instance of a PaaS resource instead of the entire service. Consumers can only connect to the specific resource. Access to any other resource in the service is blocked. This mechanism provides protection against data leakage risks.
  • Global reach: Connect privately to services running in other regions. The consumer’s virtual network could be in region A and it can connect to services behind Private Link in region B.
  • Extend to your own services: Enable the same experience and functionality to render your service privately to consumers in Azure. By placing your service behind a standard Azure Load Balancer, you can enable it for Private Link. The consumer can then connect directly to your service using a private endpoint in their own virtual network. You can manage the connection requests using an approval call flow. Azure Private Link works for consumers and services belonging to different Azure Active Directory tenants.

Learn how to secure your Azure PaaS resources with Azure Private Link today at The Azure Academy :

Here you find more Information about Azure Private Link


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#Microsoft Azure Migrate Assessments in Action #VMWare to #Cloud

Azure Migrate

This blogpost is about the Microsoft Azure Migrate tool in the Cloud doing Azure Migrate assessments to see if your on-premises Datacenter is ready for Azure Cloud Services. Before you migrate your workloads with Azure Migrate to the Microsoft Azure Cloud, you want to know the costs before the migration and what your options are in the transition. For example when you have hardware in your on-premises Datacenter which is too high qua hardware specs like Memory, CPU and storage and you can do with less Compute power, then the performance assessments are really interesting. From here you see a step-by-step guide for VMWare workload assessment(s) to Azure Cloud.

Azure Migrate preparation for VMware workload

When you search for ‘Azure Migrate’ in your Azure Subscription and click on the services you will see the Azure Migrate Overview screen. When you don’t have a Microsoft Azure subscription yet, you can get one here

Click on Assess and Migrate Servers.

Before we go further with the server migration assessments for VMware, there are more Azure Migration tools available to do assessments and migrations like the following goals :

 

For Databases Microsoft Azure Migrate uses the Data Migration Assistant for the Assessment and the Data migration to Azure SQL Cloud.
The Data Migration Assistant (DMA) helps you upgrade to a modern data platform by detecting compatibility issues that can impact database functionality in your new version of SQL Server or Azure SQL Database. DMA recommends performance and reliability improvements for your target environment and allows you to move your schema, data, and uncontained objects from your source server to your target server.

 

To identify the right Azure SQL Database / Managed Instance SKU for your on-premises Database you can use the CLI with a Script :

Here you find more detailed information about the Data Migration Assistant

When you have a Virtual Desktop Infrastructure on-premises and you want to migrate to Windows Virtual Desktop (WVD) you can use this Azure Migrate tool :

ISV Lakeside with SysTrack

You can vote for the tools or scenarios that you would like to be integrated with Azure Migrate via this Online form

When you are in the beginning of your Cloud Transition journey, what will go first to the Cloud?

  1. On-premises mail to Microsoft Office 365
  2. File Server Clusters to Office 365 into Teams, Onedrive for Business
  3. From Apps On-premises to SaaS or Paas solutions
  4. From On-premises Websites to Azure Cloud Solutions like Azure Web App.
  5. From SQL Clusters On-Premises to Azure SQL Managed Instances in the Cloud
  6. And at last Migrate Servers to Azure IaaS

Of course there are much more scenarios like Lift and Shift or modernize your workload in the Cloud like moving to Azure Kubernetes Services for example instead of IaaS Virtual Machines.

So when you want to start moving your On-premises Website(s) or WebApp, Microsoft Azure Migrate Services has a tool for that too :

Assess any app with an endpoint scan. Download the Migration Assistant and start your .NET and PHP app migration to Azure App Service.

Click on Assess

and from here you can plan your migration.

At last when you have to move a big enterprise On-premises Datacenter to the Azure Cloud with a lot of Servers for example 10.000, you can use Azure Data Box Migration
The Microsoft Azure Data Box cloud solution lets you send terabytes of data into Azure in a quick, inexpensive, and reliable way. The secure data transfer is accelerated by shipping you a proprietary Data Box storage device. Each storage device has a maximum usable storage capacity of 80 TB and is transported to your datacenter through a regional carrier. The device has a rugged casing to protect and secure data during the transit.

Azure Data Box

When you want to read more about Microsoft Azure Migrate go to the website.

Microsoft Azure Migrate assessment for VMware platform

First we make the Azure Migrate Project ready in the Microsoft Azure Portal.

Select the right Azure Subscription and Resource group to collect the metadata reported by your On-premises environment. Give your Migrate project a name and select the geography.

Here you can select from different Assessment Tools
Select Azure Migrate Server Assessment

Here you can select from different Migration Tools
Select Azure Migrate Server Migration

Add your Tools in the Azure Portal.

Here you see both Microsoft Azure Migrate tools for the Assessment and the Migration as well.
We are going for the Assessment quick start, so click on discover

From here we select with VMware vShere Hypervisor, so you can download the Azure Migrate Appliance for VMware ( 12GB Ova file).

You can also work with an Import CSV file but that’s Preview.

Now you can download and Install the Azure Migrate Virtual Appliance on VMware.
Follow the instructions here

When you have installed the Microsoft Azure Migrate Virtual Appliance for VMware successfully in your environment and has access to all the Virtual Machines then you can run the setup in the Appliance to make connectivity with your Azure subscription.

This will check all the prerequisites and get the updates.

Getting access to vCenter Server with the right permissions.

Now when your Azure Migrate Virtual Appliance for VMware is ready and collecting metadata, we see in the Microsoft Azure Portal the discovery running :

Discovery is in Progress.

After a view minutes we have discovered the Servers running on VMware platform On-premises.

Discovered Servers

Now we have the Servers in our metadata, we can do the Assessment(s) to get all the information we want for preparing to migrate to Azure Cloud Services. Click on Assess.

From here you give the Assessment a name and then you go to the properties of the assessment by clicking on View All

Here you can set the parameters for the assessment for example based on :

  1. Reserved instances
  2. Storage types
  3. Sizing criterion like Performance-Based
  4. Percentile Utilization
  5. Azure VM series to use
  6. Discount
  7. VM Uptime
  8. Offer pricing like Enterprise Agreement Support or Pay-As-You-Go
  9. Hybrid Benefit offer.

Here I made different Azure Migrate Assessment groups with different parameters to see the difference in Costs.

Here you see for example Migrate As Is On-Premises and Performance-Based, but also an Azure Migrate Assessment without SQL Cluster Nodes. In this way you can make your own Azure Migrate Assessment with all your Servers or just a view Servers of your On-premises solution which you want to Migrate to Azure Cloud Services.

Overview of your Azure Migrate Assessment

Server is ready for migration

 

Server Ready but with conditions

Microsoft Azure Migrate gives you all the information to make the right decisions to migrate you workload from VMware to Microsoft Azure Cloud. When the Azure Migrate Assessment(s) are ready you can make a CSV export file to check the information before you migrate.

Overview of the Azure Migrate Assessment

Azure Migrate Assessment based on Performance for the VM
and there is a separated tab for Storage.

When your assessment is done, you can do the migration by replicating them to Microsoft Azure.

Here you can see the Azure Migrate for VMware (Agentless) steps

More Microsoft Azure Feature resources :

Dependency mapping helps you to visualize dependencies across machines

Setup Agentless Dependency visualization for assessment (Preview) 

Assess the readiness of a SQL Server data estate migrating to Azure SQL Database using the Data Migration Assistant

Conclusion

Microsoft Azure Migrate gives you insight information about your own On-Premises Datacenter by doing assessments to get the right migration information to move to Microsoft Azure Cloud. It gives you Azure Cloud costs before you do any migration at all, based on Total Cost of Owner (TCO) ship you can calculate if your solution in the Microsoft Azure Cloud is cheaper or not. Realize that’s it is not always about the money but also :

  • Innovations
  • Time to market
  • New Features
  • Flexibility
  • Scalability
  • Availability
  • Not owning hardware anymore
  • Less management (Hardware)

Hope this blog post helps you by your transition journey to Microsoft Azure Cloud