Cloud and Datacenter Management Blog

Microsoft Hybrid Cloud blogsite about Management


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Bye Bye 2018 vs Hello 2019 #MVPbuzz #Azure #Cloud #AzureDevOps #Education #Code #Analytics

Happy New Year !

First of all Thank you for following me and Sharing Microsoft Cloud and Datacenter Management content on Social Media 🙂 Sharing & Learning Together is Better. 

Here some work I did for the Community in 2018 :

  •  I wrote 62 Blogposts in 2018 on https://mountainss.wordpress.com and shared them on LinkedIn,
    Twitter, Facebook and Microsoft Tech Community
  • Made a Blogpost Serie about :
    It’s all about your Datacenter transition to the Cloud by Design and by Security.
    Microsoft Azure Hub-Spoke model by Enterprise Design

  • Started Azure DevOps Community Group on LinkedIn
  • Together with Community Groups :  Microsoft Azure Monitor and Security for Hybrid IT and
    Containers in the Cloud

    @Jamesvandenberg
  • Welcome 577 New Followers on Twitter of the 5904 Followers 🙂
    More then 2.807.000 Tweet impressions in One year !
  • Started with Friday is MVPbuzz Day for Education to get Azure Cloud in the Classroom, working together with Teachers and Students in my Free time.
  • Working with Microsoft Learn in Teams for the Students.
  • Meetings and Speaking for Education, all about Azure and AzureStack Technologies.
  • Conferences, like the Global MVP Summit 2018, DevOps Amsterdam, Community Group meetings.
    Microsoft Ignite, Microsoft Build, Microsoft Connect events.
  • Almost every week Microsoft Product Group Intervention (PGI) sessions Online.
  • Sharing the News every Day via Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Microsoft Tech Community, Blog

But what is coming in 2019 ?

Rocking with Azure in the Classroom !

I will continue every day sharing knowledge with the Community and continue my Free work on MVPbuzz Friday for Education to get Azure Cloud Technology in the Classroom for Teachers and Students.
The trend I see for 2019 is more Infrastructure and Security by Code with Microsoft Azure DevOps
and of course you have to be in Control with Microsoft Azure Monitor

I will write a blogpost in January 2019 about Microsoft Azure Hub-Spoke model by Enterprise Design 4 of 4 : Optimize your Azure Workload.

More Items in 2019 to come :

  • Microsoft Azure Security Center for Hybrid IT
  • Windows Server 2019 in combination with Azure Cloud Services.
  • More on Containers in the Cloud
  • Azure Stack and ASDK
  • Integration with Azure Cloud.
  • API Management
  • Azure DevOps Pipelines and Collabration
  • Azure IoT for Smart Cities and Buildings combined with AI Technology

2019 will be a Great year again with New Microsoft Technologies and Features for your business.


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#Microsoft #AzureDevOps – Azure Pipelines, #Azure Boards + GitHub with @AbelSquidHead #LoECDA

Azure DevOps for CI/CD

Azure DevOps Services is a cloud service for collaborating on code development. It provides an integrated set of features that you access through your web browser or IDE client. The features are included, as follows:

  • Git repositories for source control of your code
  • Build and release services to support continuous integration and delivery of your apps
  • Agile tools to support planning and tracking your work, code defects, and issues using Kanban and Scrum methods
  • Many tools to test your apps, including manual/exploratory testing, load testing, and continuous testing
  • Highly customizable dashboards for sharing progress and trends
  • Built-in wiki for sharing information with your team

The Azure DevOps ecosystem also provides support for adding extensions and integrating with other popular services, such as: Campfire, Slack, Trello, UserVoice, and more, and developing your own custom extensions.

Start your CI/CD Pipelines Today with Azure DevOps

More information about Microsoft Azure DevOps :

Microsoft Azure DevOps Docs

Azure DevOps Community Group on LinkedIn

Azure DevOps PODCAST

and stay up-to-date on Azure DevOps via Twitter :

The #LoECDA Team

@AzureDevOps

@DonovanBrown

@AbelSquidHead

@jldeen

@damovisa

@StevenMurawski


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View Container Live logs with #Azure Monitoring #AKS #Kubernetes #Containers #AzureDevOps

Monitoring Azure Kubernetes Cluster

Azure Monitor for containers is a feature designed to monitor the performance of container workloads deployed to either Azure Container Instances or managed Kubernetes clusters hosted on Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS). Monitoring your containers is critical, especially when you’re running a production cluster, at scale, with multiple applications.
Azure Monitor for containers gives you performance visibility by collecting memory and processor metrics from controllers, nodes, and containers that are available in Kubernetes through the Metrics API. Container logs are also collected. After you enable monitoring from Kubernetes clusters, these metrics and logs are automatically collected for you through a containerized version of the Log Analytics agent for Linux and stored in your Log Analytics workspace.

Here you find awesome documentation about Understanding AKS cluster performance with Azure Monitor for containers

What I really like is that you now can see the Container Live logs from the Azure portal and see what is going on in the background of a Container 🙂

Activate Azure Kubernetes Container Live Logs

Here you see the Container Live logs

This feature provides a real-time view into your Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) container logs (stdout/stderr) without having to run kubectl commands. When you select this option, new pane appears below the containers performance data table on the Containers view, and it shows live logging generated by the container engine to further assist in troubleshooting issues in real time.
Live logs supports three different methods to control access to the logs:

  1. AKS without Kubernetes RBAC authorization enabled
  2. AKS enabled with Kubernetes RBAC authorization
  3. AKS enabled with Azure Active Directory (AD) SAML based single-sign on

You even can search in the Container Live Logs for Troubleshooting and history :

Search on ssh

Azure Monitor for containers uses a containerized version of the Log Analytics agent for Linux. After initial deployment, there are routine or optional tasks you may need to perform during its lifecycle.
Because of this agent you can work with Log Analytics in Azure Monitor :

Log Analytics on Containers.

Here you find more on Log Analytics query language

Conclusion :

When you have your production workload running on Azure Kubernetes Clusters, It’s important to monitor to keep you in Control of the solution in Microsoft Azure and watch for improvements like performance for the business. With Container Live logs you can see what is going on in the Containers when you have issues and that’s great for troubleshooting to get your problem solved fast. Get your workload into Azure Containers and make your Azure DevOps CI/CD Pipelines in the Cloud.

Join the LinkedIn Community Groups for :

Containers in the Cloud

Azure DevOps Community

Microsoft Azure Monitor & Security for Hybrid IT


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Getting started with #Microsoft Azure Cognitive Services in #Containers #Azure #AI #AKS #Docker

Microsoft Visual Studio Code Tools for AI

With container support, customers can use Azure’s intelligent Cognitive Services capabilities, wherever the data resides. This means customers can perform facial recognition, OCR, or text analytics operations without sending their content to the cloud. Their intelligent apps are portable and scale with greater consistency whether they run on the edge or in Azure.

Bringing AI to the Edge via  Corporate Vice President, Azure AI Eric Boyd

Get started with these Azure Cognitive Services Containers

Building solutions with machine learning often requires a data scientist. Azure Cognitive Services enable organizations to take advantage of AI with developers, without requiring a data scientist. We do this by taking the machine learning models and the pipelines and the infrastructure needed to build a model and packaging it up into a Cognitive Service for vision, speech, search, text processing, language understanding, and more. This makes it possible for anyone who can write a program, to now use machine learning to improve an application. However, many enterprises still face challenges building large-scale AI systems. Today Microsoft announced container support for Cognitive Services, making it significantly easier for developers to build ML-driven solutions.

Microsoft got the following Containers :

  • Text Analytics Containers
  • Face Container
  • Recognize Text Container

More information from Director of Program Management Applied AI Lance Olson here

Start with Installing and running Containers

Request access to the private container registry

You must first complete and submit the Cognitive Services Vision Containers Request form to request access to the Face container. The form requests information about you, your company, and the user scenario for which you’ll use the container. Once submitted, the Azure Cognitive Services team reviews the form to ensure that you meet the criteria for access to the private container registry.

Important !

You must use an email address associated with either a Microsoft Account (MSA) or Azure Active Directory (Azure AD) account in the form. If your request is approved, you then receive an email with instructions describing how to obtain your credentials and access the private container registry.

Read more about installing the Containers here

The Face container uses a common configuration framework, so that you can easily configure and manage storage, logging and telemetry, and security settings for your containers.
Configuration settings
Configuration settings in the Face container are hierarchical, and all containers use a shared hierarchy, based on the following top-level structure:

  • ApiKey
  • ApplicationInsights
  • Authentication
  • Billing
  • CloudAI
  • Eula
  • Fluentd
  • Logging
  • Mounts

Read more here about Configuring the Containers

Follow Containers in the Cloud Community Group

 


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via @MSAzureCAT Enterprise #Cloud Control Plane Planning #AzureDevOps #Pipelines

End-to-end Pipelines for Automating Microsoft Azure Deployments

 

Overview :

Imagine a fully automated, end-to-end pipeline for your cloud deployments—one that encompasses and automates everything:

• Source code repos.
• The build and release iterations.
• Agile processes supported by continuous integration and continuous deployment (CI/CD)
• Security and governance.
• Business unit chargebacks.
• Support and maintenance.

Azure services and infrastructure-as-code (IaC) make control plane automation very achievable. Many enterprise IT groups dream of creating or unifying their disparate automation processes and supporting a common, enterprise-wide datacenter control plane in the cloud that is integrated with their existing or new DevOps workflows. Their development environments may use Jenkins, Azure DevOps Services (formerly Visual Studio Team Services), Visual Studio Team Foundation Server (TFS), Atlassian, or other services. The challenge is to automate beyond the CI/CD pipeline to the management and policy layers. From a planning and architecture standpoint, it can seem like an overwhelming program of interdependent systems and processes. This guide outlines a planning process that you can use for automated support of your cloud deployments and DevOps workflows beyond the CI/CD pipeline. The Azure platform provides services you can use, or you can choose to work with third-party or open source options. The process is based on real-world examples that we have deployed with enterprise customers on Azure.

This whitepaper was authored by Tim Ehlen. It was edited by Nanette Ray. It was reviewed by AzureCAT.

Download the Awesome eBook here on the AzureCAT Team Blog

Follow AzureCAT and SQLCAT on Twitter


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Using #Azure Pipelines for your Open Source Project #AzureDevOps

Azure Pipelines for your Open Source Projects

Damian speaks to Edward Thomson about how to get started with Azure Pipelines – right from GitHub. The deep integration and GitHub Marketplace app for Azure Pipelines makes it incredibly easy to build your projects no matter what language you’re using. You can even use the builds as part of your PR checks!

https://github.com/marketplace/azure-pipelines

Edward shows us the incredible (free!) offers for open and closed source projects, and walks through creating and running a new Azure Pipelines build from scratch in only a few minutes.

Subscribe to Azure DevOps on YouTube


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Microsoft #Azure Service Fabric Mesh for your #Microservices and #Container Apps in the #Cloud

Microsoft Service Fabric Mesh

Azure Service Fabric Mesh is a fully managed service that enables developers to deploy microservices applications without managing virtual machines, storage, or networking. Applications hosted on Service Fabric Mesh run and scale without you worrying about the infrastructure powering it. Service Fabric Mesh consists of clusters of thousands of machines. All cluster operations are hidden from the developer. Simply upload your code and specify resources you need, availability requirements, and resource limits. Service Fabric Mesh automatically allocates the infrastructure and handles infrastructure failures, making sure your applications are highly available. You only need to care about the health and responsiveness of your application-not the infrastructure.

With Service Fabric Mesh you can:

  • “Lift and shift” existing applications into containers to modernize and run your current applications at scale.
  • Build and deploy new microservices applications at scale in Azure. Integrate with other Azure services or existing applications running in containers. Each microservice is part of a secure, network isolated application with resource governance policies defined for CPU cores, memory, disk space, and more.
  • Integrate with and extend existing applications without making changes to those applications. Use your own virtual network to connect existing application to the new application.
  • Modernize your existing Cloud Services applications by migrating to Service Fabric Mesh.

Build high-availability into your application architecture by co-locating your compute, storage, networking, and data resources within a zone and replicating in other zones. Azure services that support Availability Zones fall into two categories:

  • Zonal services – you pin the resource to a specific zone (for example, virtual machines, managed disks, IP addresses)
  • Zone-redundant services – platform replicates automatically across zones (for example, zone-redundant storage, SQL Database).

To achieve comprehensive business continuity on Azure, build your application architecture using the combination of Availability Zones with Azure region pairs. You can synchronously replicate your applications and data using Availability Zones within an Azure region for high-availability and asynchronously replicate across Azure regions for disaster recovery protection.

Store state in an Azure Service Fabric Mesh application by mounting an Azure Files based volume inside the container

Twitter AMA on Service Fabric Mesh :

The Service Fabric team will be hosting an Ask Me Anything (AMA) (more like “ask us anything”!) session for Service Fabric Mesh on Twitter on Tuesday, October 30thfrom 9am to 10:30am PST. Tweet to @servicefabric or @AzureSupport using #SFMeshAMA with your questions on Mesh and Service Fabric. More information here

More information about Azure Service Fabric Mesh :

Microsoft Azure Service Fabric Mesh LAB on Github

Get started with Microsoft Azure Service Fabric for your Microservices and Container Apps

Service Fabric Microsoft Ignite 2018 sessions

JOIN Containers in the Cloud Community Group on LinkedIn here