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Microsoft SystemCenter blogsite about virtualization on-premises and Cloud

Creating VM Cluster on Azure #Cloud with Terraform #IaC #Azure #Terraform #Linux #Winserv

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Type az and you should see this Azure CLI

Type Terraform and you should see the terraform commands

 

Install and configure Terraform to provision VMs and other infrastructure into Azure

Before you begin with Terraform and deploying your solution to Microsoft Azure you have to install Azure CLI and Terraform for your OS.

In the following step-by-step guide we will deploy a VM Cluster with Terraform into Microsoft Azure Cloud Services.

First we open Powershell in Administrator mode :

You should have your Terraform script ready.

It’s great to edit your Terraform script in Visual Studio Code

Create a Terraform configuration file
In this section, you create a file that contains resource definitions for your infrastructure.
Create a new file named main.tf.
Copy following sample resource definitions into the newly created main.tf file:


resource “azurerm_resource_group” “test” {
name = “acctestrg”
location = “West US 2”
}

resource “azurerm_virtual_network” “test” {
name = “acctvn”
address_space = [“10.0.0.0/16”]
location = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.location}”
resource_group_name = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.name}”
}

resource “azurerm_subnet” “test” {
name = “acctsub”
resource_group_name = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.name}”
virtual_network_name = “${azurerm_virtual_network.test.name}”
address_prefix = “10.0.2.0/24”
}

resource “azurerm_public_ip” “test” {
name = “publicIPForLB”
location = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.location}”
resource_group_name = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.name}”
public_ip_address_allocation = “static”
}

resource “azurerm_lb” “test” {
name = “loadBalancer”
location = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.location}”
resource_group_name = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.name}”

frontend_ip_configuration {
name = “publicIPAddress”
public_ip_address_id = “${azurerm_public_ip.test.id}”
}
}

resource “azurerm_lb_backend_address_pool” “test” {
resource_group_name = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.name}”
loadbalancer_id = “${azurerm_lb.test.id}”
name = “BackEndAddressPool”
}

resource “azurerm_network_interface” “test” {
count = 2
name = “acctni${count.index}”
location = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.location}”
resource_group_name = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.name}”

ip_configuration {
name = “testConfiguration”
subnet_id = “${azurerm_subnet.test.id}”
private_ip_address_allocation = “dynamic”
load_balancer_backend_address_pools_ids = [“${azurerm_lb_backend_address_pool.test.id}”]
}
}

resource “azurerm_managed_disk” “test” {
count = 2
name = “datadisk_existing_${count.index}”
location = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.location}”
resource_group_name = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.name}”
storage_account_type = “Standard_LRS”
create_option = “Empty”
disk_size_gb = “1023”
}

resource “azurerm_availability_set” “avset” {
name = “avset”
location = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.location}”
resource_group_name = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.name}”
platform_fault_domain_count = 2
platform_update_domain_count = 2
managed = true
}

resource “azurerm_virtual_machine” “test” {
count = 2
name = “acctvm${count.index}”
location = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.location}”
availability_set_id = “${azurerm_availability_set.avset.id}”
resource_group_name = “${azurerm_resource_group.test.name}”
network_interface_ids = [“${element(azurerm_network_interface.test.*.id, count.index)}”]
vm_size = “Standard_DS1_v2”

# Uncomment this line to delete the OS disk automatically when deleting the VM
# delete_os_disk_on_termination = true

# Uncomment this line to delete the data disks automatically when deleting the VM
# delete_data_disks_on_termination = true

storage_image_reference {
publisher = “Canonical”
offer = “UbuntuServer”
sku = “16.04-LTS”
version = “latest”
}

storage_os_disk {
name = “myosdisk${count.index}”
caching = “ReadWrite”
create_option = “FromImage”
managed_disk_type = “Standard_LRS”
}

# Optional data disks
storage_data_disk {
name = “datadisk_new_${count.index}”
managed_disk_type = “Standard_LRS”
create_option = “Empty”
lun = 0
disk_size_gb = “1023”
}

storage_data_disk {
name = “${element(azurerm_managed_disk.test.*.name, count.index)}”
managed_disk_id = “${element(azurerm_managed_disk.test.*.id, count.index)}”
create_option = “Attach”
lun = 1
disk_size_gb = “${element(azurerm_managed_disk.test.*.disk_size_gb, count.index)}”
}

os_profile {
computer_name = “hostname”
admin_username = “testadmin”
admin_password = “Password1234!”
}

os_profile_linux_config {
disable_password_authentication = false
}

tags {
environment = “staging”
}
}


Type : terraform init

You should see this screen.

Type : az login

We now logging into Microsoft Azure subscription.

https://microsoft.com/devicelogin

Insert the code from your Powershell screen.

Now we have the Terraform INIT running and we are connected to our Azure Subscription 😉

Type : terraform plan

It will refreshing the state and getting ready for deployment.

Type : terraform apply

and then type : yes <enter>

Terraform is now creating the azure resources

Azure resource group acctestrg is made

Terraform deployment VM Cluster on Azure is Ready 😉

Azure VM Cluster is running.

When you want to remove the complete Azure VM Cluster with terraform, it’s really easy :

Type : terraform destroy

and then type : yes <enter>

Azure resources are being deleted via terraform script

Terraform destroyed the Azure VM Cluster


All Azure Resources of the VM Cluster are removed.

Hope this step-by-step guide deploying infrastructure as Code with terraform will help you with your own Cloud solutions in Microsoft azure.

Ps. don’t forget to install Visual Studio Code Azure Terraform extension and play !

#MVPbuzz


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Author: James van den Berg

I'm Microsoft Architect and ICT Specialist and Microsoft MVP System Center Cloud and Datacenter Management

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