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#Microsoft Project Olympus #Cloud hardware #Innovation at Scale in #Azure

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Microsoft’s Project Olympus delivers cloud hardware innovation at scale.

Deployed in Azure
Project Olympus hardware is now deployed in volume production with the Fv2 virtual machine (VM) family. The Fv2 family are the fastest VMs in Azure and offer the fastest Intel® Xeon® Scalable processors in the public cloud. It addresses the growing demand for massive large-scale computation from customers doing financial modeling, scientific analysis, genomics, geothermal visualization, and deep learning.
The Fv2 VM family is among the first Project Olympus designs productized in Azure. More deployments and silicon innovation will follow to support the exploding growth of cloud services and computing power needed for emerging cloud workloads such as big data analytics, machine learning, and Artificial Intelligence (AI).

This article describes the available sizes and options for the Azure virtual machines you can use to run your Windows apps and workloads. It also provides deployment considerations to be aware of when you’re planning to use these resources. This article is also available for Linux virtual machines.

the Project Olympus Sub-Group. Project Olympus is Microsoft’s next generation rack-level solution that is open-sourced through Open Compute Project

Project Cerberus is a NIST 800-193 compliant hardware root of trust specifically designed to provide robust security for all platform firmware. It provides a hardware root of trust for firmware on the motherboard (UEFI BIOS, BMC, Options ROMs) as well as on peripheral I/O devices by enforcing strict access control and integrity verification from pre-boot and continuing to runtime.

Specifically, Project Cerberus can help defend platform firmware from the following threats:

  • Malicious insiders with administrative privilege or access to hardware
  • Hackers and malware that exploit bugs in the operating system, application, or hypervisor
  • Supply chain attacks (manufacturing, assembly, in-transit)
  • Compromised firmware binaries

More information on GitHub here in Draft

Author: James van den Berg

I'm Microsoft Architect and ICT Specialist and Microsoft MVP Cloud and Datacenter Management Microsoft MVP Windows Insider Microsoft Tech Community Insider Microsoft Azure Advisor

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