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Merry Christmas and Happy New Year 2013 ! #Hyperv #sysctr #WindowsAzure #SCVMM

Thank you for follow

 

Microsoft Cheers

Nokia Lumia 920 Wish

System Center Team 2012

 

WindowsAzure Team

 

Train mountainss

Travis Wright Thank you

Happy New Year

 


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#Microsoft Windows Phone 8 Company Portal App #WP8 #sysctr

Nokia Lumia 920

Overview

The Windows Phone 8 Company Portal App enables Windows Phone 8 devices which are managed by Microsoft System Center 2012 Configuration Manager SP1 and Windows Intune to be able to view and install line of business applications targeted to the Windows Phone 8 devices by their administrators.
The Windows Phone 8 Company Portal App is downloaded by the administrator and made available to the management system infrastructure to enable device enrollment for Windows Phone 8 devices. The Company Portal App is needed to manage Windows Phone 8 devices. After downloading the Windows Phone 8 Company Portal App, the administrator must code-sign the app.

Download the Windows Phone 8 Company Portal App here


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How to Add a Native-Boot Virtual Hard Disk to the Boot Menu #Hyperv

VHDBoot

The following procedures describe how to add a native-boot virtual hard disk (VHD) to the boot menu using the BCDedit tool. If you are adding the VHD to a computer that already has a Windows® 8 installation, you will have to add a boot entry to the menu. If you are adding the VHD to a computer that is running an older version of Windows, for example Windows Server® 2008, you will have to update the system partition using the BCDboot tool and then modify the boot menu using the BCDedit tool. The .vhd file format is supported for native boot on a computer that has a Windows® 7 boot environment, but you will have to update the system partition to a Windows 8 environment to use the .vhdx file format.

Update the Boot Menu to Add a VHD


To update a BIOS-based computer to include a Windows 8 boot menu


  1. Copy the .vhd or .vhdx file to the destination computer. For example, at a command prompt, type:
    copy N:\VHDs\windows.vhdx C:
  2. Use the DiskPart tool in Windows PE to attach the VHD on the destination computer. You can attach a VHD by using the Attach vdisk command. This enables the VHD so that it appears on the host as a disk drive instead of as a .vhd file. At a command prompt, type:
    diskpart
    select vdisk file=c:\windows.vhdx
    attach vdisk
    list volume
    select volume <volume_number_of_attached_VHD>
    assign letter=v
    exit
  3. Use the BCDboot tool, located in the \System32 directory of the VHD image or in Windows PE to copy the boot environment files and Boot Configuration Data (BCD) configuration from the \Windows directory in the VHD to the system partition. On a computer that has BIOS firmware, the system partition is the active partition of the first hard disk. For example, to use BCDboot from the VHD image, at a command prompt, type:
    cd v:\windows\system32
    bcdboot v:\windows

The BCDboot tool automatically imports information from the existing installation when updating the BCD. The computer is now updated to include a Windows 8 boot environment. You can now follow the steps in the section “To add a native-boot VHD to an existing Windows 8 boot menu” later in this topic.

To update a UEFI-based computer to include a Windows 8 boot menu


  1. Copy the .vhd or .vhdx file to the destination computer. For example, at a command prompt, type:
    copy N:\VHDs\windows.vhdx C:
  2. Use the DiskPart tool in Windows PE to attach the VHD on the destination computer. You can attach a VHD by using the Attach vdisk command. This enables the VHD so that it appears on the host as a disk drive instead of as a .vhdx file. At a command prompt, type:
    diskpart
    select vdisk file=C:\windows.vhdx
    attach vdisk
    list volume
    select volume <volume_number_of_attached_VHD>
    assign letter=v
    exit
  3. On a UEFI-based computer, the system partition is hidden by default and must be assigned a drive letter before you run the BCDboot tool. Use the DiskPart tool to locate the EFI system partition and assign a drive letter to it. At a command prompt, type:
    diskpart
    select disk 0
    list partition
    select partition <x>
    assign letter=s
    exit

    Where <x> is the 100 megabyte (MB) EFI system partition that is formatted with FAT.

  4. Use the BCDboot tool, located in the \System32 directory of the VHD image or in Windows PE to copy the boot environment files and BCD configuration from the \Windows directory in the VHD to the system partition. For example, to use BCDboot from the VHD image, at a command prompt, type:
    cd v:\windows\system32
    bcdboot v:\windows

The BCDboot tool automatically imports information from the existing installation when updating the BCD. The computer is now updated with a Windows 8 boot environment. You can now follow the steps to add a native-boot VHD to an existing Windows 8 boot menu.

To add a native-boot VHD to an existing Windows 8 boot menu


  1. Back up your BCD store using the BCDedit tool with the /export option. For example, at a command prompt, type:  bcdedit /export c:\bcdbackup
  2. Copy an existing boot entry for a Windows 8 installation. You will then modify the copy for use as the VHD boot entry. At a command prompt, type:
    bcdedit /copy {default} /d "vhd boot (locate)"

    When the BCDedit command is completed successfully, it returns a {GUID} as output in the Command Prompt window.

  3. Locate the {GUID} in the command-prompt output for the previous command. Copy the GUID, including the braces, to use in the following steps.
  4. Set the device and osdevice options for the VHD boot entry. At a command prompt, type:
    bcdedit /set {guid} device vhd=[locate]\windows.vhdx
    bcdedit /set {guid} osdevice vhd=[locate]\windows.vhdx
  5. Set the boot entry for the VHD as the default boot entry. When the computer restarts, the boot menu will display all of the Windows installations on the computer and boot into the VHD after the operating-system selection countdown is completed. At a command prompt, type:
    bcdedit /default {guid}
  6. Some x86-based systems require a boot configuration option for the kernel in order to detect certain hardware information and successfully native-boot from a VHD. At a command prompt, type:
    bcdedit /set {guid} detecthal on

For more information about how to use the BCDedit tool, see this Microsoft Web site.


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Moving Applications to the #Cloud, 3rd Edition – Free Book Download #WindowsAzure

Moving Applications to Windows Azure cover

Overview

This is a PDF file of the “Moving Applications to the Cloud, Third Edition” book.
This guide is the third edition of the first volume in a series about Windows Azure. It demonstrates how you can adapt an existing on-premises ASP.NET application to one that operates in the cloud by introducing a fictitious company named Adatum that modifies its expense tracking and reimbursement system, aExpense, so that it can be deployed to Windows Azure. To illustrate the wide range of options and features in Windows Azure, this guide and the code examples available for it show a step-by-step migration process that includes using Windows Azure Web Sites, Virtual Machines, Cloud Services, and SQL Database. Together with useful information on developing, deploying, managing, and costing cloud-hosted applications, this guide provides you with a comprehensive resource for moving your applications to Window Azure.

You can download the 3rd free E-book here

 


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Go for IT : Windows Server 2012 + System Center 2012 = #WindowsAzure on 12-12-2012

windows-server-2012

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What do I have to say more on 12-12-2012 :

http://www.windowsazure.com/en-us/

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/server-cloud/windows-server/

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/server-cloud/system-center/default.aspx


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#Microsoft Baseline Configuration Analyzer 2.1 for #Winserv

 

Microsoft Base Line

Overview

Microsoft Baseline Configuration Analyzer 2.1 (MBCA 2.1) can help you maintain optimal system configuration by analyzing configurations of your computers against a predefined set of best practices, and reporting results of the analyses. Best practices are developed by a product development team or domain experts, and are packaged in the form of a best practice model. Models are available as separately-downloadable packages that can be run and analyzed by MBCA. MBCA lets users work with best practice models in a consistent, user-friendly way.

Supported operating systems: Windows 7 Enterprise, Windows 7 Professional, Windows 7 Ultimate, Windows 8, Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2003 R2 (32-Bit x86), Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2012, Windows Vista Business, Windows Vista Enterprise, Windows Vista Ultimate

Note Windows Server 2008 and 2008 R2 Server Core Installations are not supported.

  • Windows PowerShell 2.0
  • .NET Framework 2.0

You can download Microsoft Baseline Configuration Analyzer 2.1 here